Archivio per dicembre 2011

31
Dic
11

Articoli > Razionalità limitata e tecniche normative nella gestione del rischio contrattuale: nuove prospettive per la correzione dello squilibrio

Via Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

SOMMARIO: 1. Premessa storica e metodologica – 2. Rapporti di durata e a lungo termine nell’elaborazione teorica e nell’attuale disciplina dei contratti. I rimedi manutentivi. – 3. Principio di adeguamento e principio di proporzionalità. – 4. Conservazione e rinegoziazione del contratto all’esame della giurisprudenza in materia di contratti a lungo termine. – 5. L’obbligo di rinegoziare introdotto nei Principi Unidroit e nei Principi del diritto europeo dei contratti. – 6. La rinegoziazione al vaglio della dottrina civilistica – 7. (segue) e nell’analisi economica del diritto. – 8. L’incompletezza del contratto. – 9. Considerazioni di sintesi.
Via rivista.ssef.it

31
Dic
11

The behavioural law and economics

Via Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Professor Jolls introduces the new behavioral law and economics. It emphasizes legal responses that do not curtail choice but, instead, correct systemic errors.
Via www.youtube.com

30
Dic
11

PLoS ONE: Organizing Effects of Testosterone and Economic Behavior: Not Just Risk Taking

Via Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Recent literature emphasizes the role that testosterone, as well as markers indicating early exposure to T and its organizing effect on the brain (such as the ratio of second to fourth finger, ), have on performance in financial markets. These results may suggest that the main effect of T, either circulating or in fetal exposure, on economic behavior occurs through the increased willingness to take risks. However, these findings indicate that traders with a low digit ratio are not only more profitable, but more able to survive in the long run, thus the effect might consist of more than just lower risk aversion.
Via www.plosone.org

28
Dic
11

The NeuroSocial Network | Brain Blogger

Via Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond
Social neuroscience is a rapidly growing discipline that examines the relationship between the brain and social behavior. The “social brain hypothesis” posits that, over evolutionary time, living in large, social groups favored the physical growth of brain regions important for social behavior. In non-human primates, some evidence indicates that the size of the amygdala is related to social behavior. Little is known, however, about this relationship in humans. A provocative new study finds that the volume of a key component of the social brain, the amygdala, is directly related to the size and complexity of social networks in adult humans.
Via brainblogger.com

27
Dic
11

Living Earth Simulator will simulate the entire world | ExtremeTech

Via Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Looking at the larger picture, the Living Earth Simulator is really an admission that we know more about the physical universe than the social. We can predict with startling accuracy whether an asteroid will hit Earth, but we know scant little about how society might actually react to an extinction-level event. We plough billions of dollars into studying the effects and extent of climate change, but what if understood enough of the psychology and sociology behind human nature to actually change our behavior?
Via www.extremetech.com

26
Dic
11

The Marvels And The Flaws Of Intuitive Thinking Edge Master Class 2011 | Conversation | Edge

Via Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

DANIEL KAHNEMAN – The power of settings, the power of priming, and the power of unconscious thinking, all of those are a major change in psychology. I can’t think of a bigger change in my lifetime. You were asking what’s exciting? That’s exciting, to me.
Via edge.org

26
Dic
11

Heuristic optimisation in economics and econometrics | vox – Research-based policy analysis and commentary from leading economists

Via Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Economics has a long tradition of relying on quantitative models for both presenting its theory and testing it empirically. In fact, Joseph Schumpeter, in the first edition of Econometrica in 1933, described economics as the most quantitative of all sciences. Optimisation is an inherent part of this methodology. In theoretical models, agents are presented as utility maximisers and firms try to maximise profit or to minimise cost. Selecting and estimating models for given data sets amounts to optimisation as well – sums of squares are minimised and likelihoods are maximised so routinely today that often researchers may not even be aware that fitting a model means optimising it.
When building models, economists are often limited by the fact that the model later needs to be solved, ideally in a closed-form. Some researchers have abandoned relying on “representative agents” and opted for more complex models, relying on computer simulations to obtain results. Such agent-based models, if they are to be a viable alternative to more standard approaches, need to be “tuned” such that the results from these models coincide with empirical facts. This, again, is an estimation – and hence optimisation – problem. In this column, we will primarily discuss estimation problems in econometrics, but the problem is much more general and applies to many areas in economics (see Winker (2001), chapter 2).
Via voxeu.org




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