Archivio per 5 dicembre 2011

05
Dic
11

Legal Theory Blog: Hill on Behavioral Law & Economics & a Theory of Human Nature

Via Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Law has spent surprisingly little time developing a theory of human nature. Its efforts have largely focused on the abnormal – notably, those not responsible for their actions by reason of mental illness or diminished capacity. The normal has barely been addressed. Law and economics embeds a theory – that people are rational maximizers of their self-interest. Law and economics admits its theory is unrealistic; it touts instead its theory’s ability to predict. Behavioral law and economics aspires to more realism (and more predictive power). Its trajectory has, however, sometimes been contorted insofar as it has focused on exceptions to the law and economics view rather than a broader reconception of the overall endeavor. Such a reconception is desirable, necessary, and increasingly feasible.
Via lsolum.typepad.com

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05
Dic
11

The neural basis of intuitive and counterintuitive moral judgment

Via Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Neuroimaging studies on moral decision-making have thus far largely focused on differences between moral judgments with opposing utilitarian (well-being maximizing) and deontological (duty-based) content. However, these studies have investigated moral dilemmas involving extreme situations, and did not control for two distinct dimensions of moral judgment: whether or not it is intuitive (immediately compelling to most people) and whether it is utilitarian or deontological in content. By contrasting dilemmas where utilitarian judgments are counterintuitive with dilemmas in which they are intuitive, we were able to use functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the neural correlates of intuitive and counterintuitive judgments across a range of moral situations. Irrespective of content (utilitarian/deontological), counterintuitive moral judgments were associated with greater difficulty and with activation in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex, suggesting that such judgments may involve emotional conflict; intuitive judgments were linked to activation in the visual and premotor cortex. In addition, we obtained evidence that neural differences in moral judgment in such dilemmas are largely due to whether they are intuitive and not, as previously assumed, to differences between utilitarian and deontological judgments. Our findings therefore do not support theories that have generally associated utilitarian and deontological judgments with distinct neural systems.
Via scan.oxfordjournals.org




Time is real? I think not

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