Archivio per 11 dicembre 2011

11
Dic
11

PLoS Biology: Foundations of Neuroeconomics: From Philosophy to Practice

Via Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond
Evidence that neuroscience improves our understanding of economic phenomena comes from a broad array of novel experimental findings, including demonstrations of brain regions that guide responses to fair  and unfair social interactions, that resolve uncertainty dring decision making , that track loss aversion and subjective value, and that encode willingness to pay and reward error signals. Yet, neuroeconomics has been characterized as a faddish juxtaposition, not an integration, of disparate domains. More damningly, critics have charged that neuroscience and economics are fundamentally incompatible, an argument that resonates with many social scientists. Economics thrived for centuries in the absence of neuroscience and some economists argue that existing neuroeconomics research is not useful to mainstream economics.
Via www.plosbiology.org

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11
Dic
11

The iDECIDE business forum opens, first newsletter! « BrainEthics

Via Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

As you may have heard, we are currently opening a business network, entitled iDECIDE. The aim of this forum is to provide the latest news and views from the scene of neuroscience, applied to a business framework. We provide a network of selected likeminded companies from various disciplines (finance, marketing, communications).
Via brainethics.org

11
Dic
11

The role of cognitive biases in project failure. The same thing will happen with the European and Italian rehabilitation projects in particular?

Via Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

There are two distinct views of project management practice: the rational view which focuses on management tools and techniques such as those espoused by frameworks and methodologies, and the social/behavioural view which looks at the social aspect of projects – i.e. how people behave and interact in the context of a project and the wider organisation. The difference between the two is significant: one looks at how projects should be managed, it prescribes tools, techniques and practices; the other at what actually happens on projects, how people interact and how managers make decisions. The gap between the two can sometimes spell the difference between project success and failure. In many failed projects, the failure can be traced back to poor decisions, and the decisions themselves to cognitive biases: i.e. errors in judgement based on perceptions. A paper entitled, Systematic Biases and Culture in Project Failure, by Barry Shore looks at the role played by selected cognitive biases in the failure of some high profile projects. The paper also draws some general conclusions on the relationship between organisational culture and cognitive bias. This post presents a summary and review of the paper. 
Via eight2late.wordpress.com

11
Dic
11

Crises of Capitalism “is time to look beyond capitalism”

Via Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

In this RSA Animate, renowned academic David Harvey asks if it is time to look beyond capitalism towards a new social order that would allow us to live withi…
Via www.youtube.com




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