Archivio per 26 aprile 2012



26
Apr
12

Behavioural Economics Part 1

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Wendy Gordon gives an introduction to all the main principles of behavioural economics, and explains why it is of fundamental importance to the practice of qualitative research..

See on www.youtube.com

26
Apr
12

Intro to Behavioral Economics

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

In the 21st century, the toolkit of the modern designer is rapidly expanding. Design practice is maturing, and what was once a focus on aesthetics and usability is broadening to incorporate interdisciplinary knowledge from a variety of fields like behavioral economics and cognitive psychology. These disciplines shed light on the factors that impact human decision-making and motivate our behaviors.

See on vimeo.com

26
Apr
12

Franklin Award in Computer and Cognitive Science for his ACT theory.

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Some interesting insights about decision making and cognition
Cognitive Psychologist John R. Anderson gets the 2011 Franklin Award in Computer and Cognitive Science for his ACT theory.

See on www.youtube.com

26
Apr
12

The Effects of Exposure Time on Memory of Display Advertisements

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Display advertising is a multi-billion dollar industry that has
traditionally used a pricing scheme based on the number of
impressions delivered. The number of impressions of an ad is
simply the number of downloads of that ad. One impression,
however, does not differentiate between an ad that is in view
for five seconds or five minutes. Since advertisers seek brand
recognition and recall, we ask whether a time-based account-
ing of advertising can better align with advertisers’ goals.
This work aims to model the basic relationship between ad
exposure time and the probability that a viewer will remem-
ber an advertisement. We investigate this question via two
behavioral experiments, conducted using Amazon Mechan-
ical Turk, in which people viewed Web pages accompanied
by ads. The amount of time the ads were in view was either
determined endogenously (as a function of reading speed)
or exogenously (as a function of a timer and random assign-
ment). Our results suggest that for exposure times of up
to one minute, there is a strong, causal influence of expo-
sure time on ad recognition and recall, with the marginal
effects diminishing at durations beyond this level. Simple
models describing memory response as a function of the log-
arithm of exposure time provide a good fit. In addition, we
find that advertisements that are displayed when the Web
page loads attain greater marginal increases in recognition
per unit time than do ads that come into view second in
a sequence. Nonetheless, for both types of ads, exposure
time has a substantial effect. A psychologically-informed
accounting system based on ad exposure duration, sequence
and onset time may more closely align with advertiser goals
than the industry standard of impression-based accounting.

See on www.dangoldstein.com

26
Apr
12

“Applying Behavioral Economics and Cognitive Psychology to the Design Process“

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

In the 21st century, the toolkit of the modern designer is rapidly expanding.
Design practice is maturing, and what was once a focus on aesthetics and usability is broadening to incorporate interdisciplinary knowledge from a variety of fields. The problems we solve are changing too – growing in size, scope, and complexity. We now find ourselves working in a wide range of domains, from education and policy development to energy consumption and healthcare.
At the same time, it’s become increasingly apparent that whether we’re designing a mobile phone, a surgical release form, a corporate policy, or the infrastructure for a subway system, all of the design decisions we make have the potential to influence human behavior – whether we intend them to or not.

See on www.artefactgroup.com

26
Apr
12

Behavioral Economics and Its Applications Edited by Peter Diamond & Hannu Vartiainen

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Over the last decade or so, behavioral economics has fundamentally changed the way economists conceptualize the world. Behavioral economics is an umbrella of approaches that seek to extend the standard economics framework to account for relevant features of human behavior that are absent in the standard economics framework.2 Typically, this calls for borrowing from the neighboring social sciences, particularly from psychology and sociology. The emphasis is on well-documented empirical findings: at the core of behavioral economics is the conviction that making our model of an economic man more accurate will improve our understanding of economics, thereby making the discipline more useful.

It is natural for such an endeavor to begin as a subdiscipline—one that catalogs anomalies and explores alternative ways to model choice, with applications illustrating the workings of such models. A more ambitious role for behaviorally based insights is to effect how researchers in applied fields make both positive and normative analyses. By and large, this is the arena in which the usefulness of new ideas is eventually evaluated. In the long run, one expects the arguments, if useful, to be integrated into the mainstream literature.

See on press.princeton.edu

26
Apr
12

Can Post Keynesians make better use of behavioral economics?

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

In recent decades, there has been a growth in economic research programs loosely described as behavioral economics. Despite calls for closer engagement between behavioral and Post Keynesian economics, the impact of behavioral economics on the Post Keynesian literature remains relatively limited. In this paper, we examine the nature of behavioral economics and the case made by those who claim or demonstrate that it can make a contribution to Post Keynesianism. We also consider why to date behavioral economics has had such a restricted effect. We conclude that there is scope for further successful engagement between behavioral economics and Post Keynesian economics if it is based on explicitly stated common ground, defined in terms of methodology.

See on mesharpe.metapress.com




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