Archivio per gennaio 2013

31
Gen
13

Scelte economiche tra razionalità ed emotività. | Casa Imbastita …

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

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Le scelte economiche si basano solo sulla razionalità perfetta o sono influenzate da fattori diversi?

Sappiamo sempre qual è la scelta migliore e più conveniente quando decidiamo di spendere i nostri soldi?

Quanto incide l’emotività nelle scelte economiche, in situazione di crisi e di incertezza,  che gli imprenditori fanno per la propria azienda?

Secondo la teoria classica, esiste un homo oeconomicus in grado di effettuare tutte le scelte di tipo economico basandosi esclusivamente su fattori razionali. In realtà tale figura è solamente teorica e molti studi, partendo da Simon (Teoria della “razionalità limitata”) hanno dimostrato che l’uomo, nell’assumere decisioni, si fa condurre da una serie di altri elementi che hanno poco a che fare con la razionalità.

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Alessandro Cerboni‘s insight:

add your insight…

See on blog.casaimbastitacampus.it

31
Gen
13

Strategie di persuasione pubblicitaria: come la pubblicità influenza …

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Fatto sta che proprio per questo possiamo affermare, come già diceva il premio Nobel Herbert Simon (1955), che l’uomo ha una razionalità limitata. Per quanto una persona possa calcolare approfonditamente le sue scelte …

Alessandro Cerboni‘s insight:

add your insight…

See on www.igorvitale.org

31
Gen
13

Abraham Lincoln’s Advice to Business Leaders | Rethinking Complexity

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

CEOs from many highly successful businesses find relevance in the lessons to be learned from how Lincoln weathered the death of his son in his personal life and the many painful challenges he faced fighting to hold the U.S. together as one nation. In the New York Times article, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz reflected on Lincoln’s presence and authenticity as well as his ability to listen to people within his circle and beyond it.

The political struggles Lincoln and the people of the US faced during the Civil War (or the War Between the States) were enormous. We may have clashes and struggles today, but they are nothing compared to the bloody battles that consumed our country during that period.

Business is fraught with challenges and struggles. Still, with a bit of a bigger perspective, I can draw upon the lessons of Lincoln’s presidency to build and evolve my business. Gathering advice from a wide range of people, especially those who do not agree with us, is critical for any business leader just as it was for Lincoln. He listened to military, political, and economic advisors. We have to listen to customers, colleagues, experts, employees, suppliers, investors, and most of all to our own hearts.

See on www.rethinkingcomplexity.com

29
Gen
13

Behavioral Economics Improve Workforce Health Decisions

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Research about behavioral economics—the study of how people make choices, drawing on insights from psychology and economics—can be extremely useful in designing and communicating employee health plans.

Many health decisions that should be rational are not. In fact, irrational decisions that involve health benefits and health care are prevalent throughout peoples’ lives. The following are a few examples:

• Although children receive numerous public health messages, many young adults still become tobacco and drug users and/or obese and diabetic.

• While people understand the value of preventive health care and like the fact that many health plans now offer preventive care services without deductibles, co-payments or co-insurance, many still fail to get free health screenings or physical exams.

• Few consumers access the substantial amount of data that is available about hospital costs and mortality, readmission and hospital-acquired infection rates when they make decisions about hospitals and surgeons.

• Many people with addictions relapse into addictive behavior following lengthy periods of abstinence and sobriety.

• When some people reach age 65, they ask a friend which of the many Medicare plans to purchase instead of researching the options and making an informed decision.

In each of these examples, behavioral biases cloud rational judgment. Understanding these tendencies can help organizations redesign how they configure and communicate their health benefit plans to nudge people toward better decisions that produce better outcomes for participants and employers.

See on www.shrm.org

29
Gen
13

w18687.pdf?new_window=1

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond
The neoclassical view of consumers as relentless egoistic maximizers is challenged by evidence from cognitive  psychology, anthropology, evolutionary biology, and neurology. This paper begins by surveyingthe development of neoclassical consumer theory and the measurement of welfare, and expansions to encompass preference fields, nonlinear budgets, hedonic goods and household production, and consumptiondynamics. Following this, it reviews the newer evidence on consumer behavior, and what this implies for the measurement of consumer beliefs, intentions, preferences, choices, and well-being.Daniel L. McFaddenUniversity of California, Berkeley
See on www.nber.org

29
Gen
13

The Empirical Evidence Against Utility Maximizatio

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Current Economics Textbooks and Economists justify a theory of consumer behavior based on utility maximization on a priori grounds. This methodology follows Lionel Robbins’ idea that economic theory is based on logical deduction from postulates which are ‘simple and indisputable facts of experience.’ Strong evidence has emerged from many different lines of research that these ‘simple and indisputable facts of experience’ are contradicted by human behavior. In this article, we summarize some of main contradictions between predictions of utility theory and actual human behavior. Efforts to resolve these contradictions continue to be made within orthodox frameworks, but it appears likely that a paradigm shift is required.

See on papers.ssrn.com

29
Gen
13

8 Ways to Use Behavioral Economics to Benefit Your Nonprofit

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

We found this video over on Katya Anderson’s blog the other day and found it simply fascinating and extremely informative. It’s a session from the 2Behavioral economic theories contrast with a lot of traditional long standing theories, which state, the simple and compelling idea that we are capable of making the right decision for ourselves. Katya Anderson poses that we are not living in a rational world and thus human decision making is also not rational. The fact is that many of us make irrational decisions all the time whether in our buying habits or within our giving habits.

Alessandro Cerboni‘s insight:

add your insight…

See on www.davidwells.tv




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