Archivio per 13 febbraio 2013

13
Feb
13

Embodied Cognition: Our Inner Imaginings of the World around Us Make Us Who We Are [Excerpt]: Scientific American

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Cognitive scientist Benjamin K.Bergen’s Louder Than Words: The New Science of How the Mind Makes Meaning recounts that the parts of the brain engaged when throwing a baseball also fire up when visualizing the same action..

Starting as early as the 1970s, some cognitive psychologists, philosophers, and linguists began to wonder whether meaning wasn’t something totally different from a language of thought [Call it Mentalese, whichtranslates words into actual concepts: a polar bear or speed limit, for instance]. They suggested that—instead of abstract symbols—meaning might really be something much more closely intertwined with our real experiences in the world, with the bodies that we have. As a self-conscious movement started to take form, it took on a name, embodiment, which started to stand for the idea that meaning might be something that isn’t distilled away from our bodily experiences but is instead tightly bound by them. For you, the word dog might have a deep and rich meaning that involves the ways you physically interact with dogs—how they look and smell and feel. But the meaning of polar bear will be totally different, because you likely don’t have those same experiences of direct interaction.

 

See on www.scientificamerican.com

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13
Feb
13

Embodied Cognition: Our Inner Imaginings of the World around Us Make Us Who We Are [Excerpt]: Scientific American

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Cognitive scientist Benjamin K.Bergen’s Louder Than Words: The New Science of How the Mind Makes Meaning recounts that the parts of the brain engaged when throwing a baseball also fire up when visualizing the same action..

Starting as early as the 1970s, some cognitive psychologists, philosophers, and linguists began to wonder whether meaning wasn’t something totally different from a language of thought [Call it Mentalese, whichtranslates words into actual concepts: a polar bear or speed limit, for instance]. They suggested that—instead of abstract symbols—meaning might really be something much more closely intertwined with our real experiences in the world, with the bodies that we have. As a self-conscious movement started to take form, it took on a name, embodiment, which started to stand for the idea that meaning might be something that isn’t distilled away from our bodily experiences but is instead tightly bound by them. For you, the word dog might have a deep and rich meaning that involves the ways you physically interact with dogs—how they look and smell and feel. But the meaning of polar bear will be totally different, because you likely don’t have those same experiences of direct interaction.

 

See on scientificamerican.com

13
Feb
13

Unconscious Branding by Douglas Van Praet | Neuromarketing

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Book Review: Unconscious Branding: How Neuroscience Can Empower (and Inspire) Marketing by Douglas Van Praet “The fact of the matter is anyone can do neuromarketing without ever scanning a single brain.” This statement from Douglas Van Praet, an ad…

See on neurosciencemarketing.com

13
Feb
13

Unconscious Branding by Douglas Van Praet | Neuromarketing

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Book Review: Unconscious Branding: How Neuroscience Can Empower (and Inspire) Marketing by Douglas Van Praet “The fact of the matter is anyone can do neuromarketing without ever scanning a single brain.” This statement from Douglas Van Praet, an ad…

See on www.neurosciencemarketing.com

13
Feb
13

Statistics, Economics & Neuroscience: HERDING BEHAVIOR AND OVERCONFIDENCE EFFECT

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Behaviors and opinions of single individuals may be influenced by the dynamics operating within the groups where they interact. Likely, this influence is stronger when uncertainty characterizes the decisional stage [1].  The conformity to common behaviors  has been explained originally in ethology by the selfish herd theory as an attempt to reduce the predation risk [2]. In human environment, the herd behaviors may take place in several situations and may affect deeply large groups of population. This is the case, for example, of the so called boom and bust phases in the stock markets. An explanation of the molding of a common decision (or opinion) within the financial markets has been given by the thought contagion theories, whereby single investors decide their operations by following the trend of the market.

See on statsneuro.blogspot.it

13
Feb
13

Statistics, Economics & Neuroscience: HERDING BEHAVIOR AND OVERCONFIDENCE EFFECT

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Behaviors and opinions of single individuals may be influenced by the dynamics operating within the groups where they interact. Likely, this influence is stronger when uncertainty characterizes the decisional stage [1].  The conformity to common behaviors  has been explained originally in ethology by the selfish herd theory as an attempt to reduce the predation risk [2]. In human environment, the herd behaviors may take place in several situations and may affect deeply large groups of population. This is the case, for example, of the so called boom and bust phases in the stock markets. An explanation of the molding of a common decision (or opinion) within the financial markets has been given by the thought contagion theories, whereby single investors decide their operations by following the trend of the market.

See on statsneuro.blogspot.it

13
Feb
13

Predicting Music Consumption

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Music consumption is a tricky thing to try to predict. We are all individuals with unique tastes and lives, into which music is interwoven to varying degrees. Yet millions of pounds is spent every year by music, radio, advertising and leisure industries (to name a few) to try to better understand the factors that predict our listening and music consumption behaviour.  The question on their agendas is, are there any universals that might at least loosely predict who will listen to what and how? In other words, how do we tailor music for ‘maximum impact’?

See on musicpsychology.co.uk




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