Archivio per 4 novembre 2013

04
Nov
13

The Nature of the Beast: What Behavioral Economics Is Not

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

People are complex; they defy easy summary. Like Walt Whitman, we all contain multitudes. As a discipline, economics has been successful in part because it has ignored this complexity. Instead it has focused on explaining the institutions in which decisions are made — with institutions ranging from capitalism to communism, from perfect competition to monopolies, and from rock-paper-scissors to the prisoner’s dilemma.
Behavioral economics differs from standard economics in that it uses a more realistic (and more complicated) model for people; it differs from psychology in that it maintains the focus on institutions and the contexts in which decisions are made. Behavioral economists study how the context of decisions interacts with our expanding understanding of human psychology. By combining the insights from these two very different perspectives, behavioral economists have been able to reveal new depths in ourselves.

See on www.cgdev.org

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04
Nov
13

The Nature of the Beast: What Behavioral Economics Is Not

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

People are complex; they defy easy summary. Like Walt Whitman, we all contain multitudes. As a discipline, economics has been successful in part because it has ignored this complexity. Instead it has focused on explaining the institutions in which decisions are made — with institutions ranging from capitalism to communism, from perfect competition to monopolies, and from rock-paper-scissors to the prisoner’s dilemma.
Behavioral economics differs from standard economics in that it uses a more realistic (and more complicated) model for people; it differs from psychology in that it maintains the focus on institutions and the contexts in which decisions are made. Behavioral economists study how the context of decisions interacts with our expanding understanding of human psychology. By combining the insights from these two very different perspectives, behavioral economists have been able to reveal new depths in ourselves.

See on cgdev.org

04
Nov
13

Che cos’è la mente estesa?

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Che cos’è la mente estesa? 

 Il nostro problema consiste nel fatto che abbiamo cercato la coscienza dove nonc’è. Dovremmo invece cercarla dove essa si trova. La coscienza non è qualcosa cheaccade dentro di noi. Piuttosto, è qualcosa che facciamo o creiamo. Meglio: èqualcosa che realizziamo. La coscienza assomiglia più alla danza che alla digestione(Alva Noe, 2010)
See on www.academia.edu

04
Nov
13

Che cos’è la mente estesa?

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Che cos’è la mente estesa? 

 Il nostro problema consiste nel fatto che abbiamo cercato la coscienza dove nonc’è. Dovremmo invece cercarla dove essa si trova. La coscienza non è qualcosa cheaccade dentro di noi. Piuttosto, è qualcosa che facciamo o creiamo. Meglio: èqualcosa che realizziamo. La coscienza assomiglia più alla danza che alla digestione(Alva Noe, 2010)
See on academia.edu

04
Nov
13

How Our Minds Mislead Us: The Marvels and Flaws of Our Intuition

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

“Every year, intellectual impresario and Edge editor John Brockman summons some of our era’s greatest thinkers and unleashes them on one provocative question, whether it’s the single most elegant theory of how the world works orthe best way to enhance our cognitive toolkit. This year, he sets out on the most ambitious quest yet, a meta-exploration of thought itself:Thinking: The New Science of Decision-Making, Problem-Solving, and Prediction (public library) collects short essays and lecture adaptations from such celebrated and wide-ranging (though not in gender) minds as Daniel Dennett, Jonathan Haidt, Dan Gilbert, and Timothy Wilson, covering subjects as diverse as morality, essentialism, and the adolescent brain.

One of the most provocative contributions comes from Nobel-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman — author of the indispensable Thinking, Fast and Slow, one of the best psychology books of 2012 — who examines “the marvels and the flaws of intuitive thinking.”

See on brainpickings.org

04
Nov
13

How Our Minds Mislead Us: The Marvels and Flaws of Our Intuition

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

“Every year, intellectual impresario and Edge editor John Brockman summons some of our era’s greatest thinkers and unleashes them on one provocative question, whether it’s the single most elegant theory of how the world works orthe best way to enhance our cognitive toolkit. This year, he sets out on the most ambitious quest yet, a meta-exploration of thought itself:Thinking: The New Science of Decision-Making, Problem-Solving, and Prediction (public library) collects short essays and lecture adaptations from such celebrated and wide-ranging (though not in gender) minds as Daniel Dennett, Jonathan Haidt, Dan Gilbert, and Timothy Wilson, covering subjects as diverse as morality, essentialism, and the adolescent brain.

One of the most provocative contributions comes from Nobel-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman — author of the indispensable Thinking, Fast and Slow, one of the best psychology books of 2012 — who examines “the marvels and the flaws of intuitive thinking.”

See on www.brainpickings.org

04
Nov
13

Confucianism and Preferences: Evidence from Lab Experiments in Taiwan and China*

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

This paper investigates how Confucianism affects individual decision making in Taiwan and in China. We found that Chinese subjects in our experiments became less accepting of Confucian values, such that they became significantly more risk loving, less loss averse, and more impatient after being primed with Confucianism, whereas Taiwanese subjects became significantly less present-based and were inclined to be more trustworthy after being primed by Confucianism. Combining the evidence from the incentivized laboratory experiments and subjective survey measures, we found evidence that Chinese subjects and Taiwanese subjects reacted differently to Confucianism.

See on ftp.iza.org




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