Archivio per 8 novembre 2013

08
Nov
13

Behavioural Economics in Competition and Consumer Policy

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Click one of the images to download a copy of Behavioural Economics in Competition and Consumer Policy (pdf: colour 2.89MB / grayscale 3.01MB)

“This book summarises the most significant developments in thinking in this area: for some it will be an accessible introduction, for others a reminder and a reference point to the more detailed analytical studies that are available.” – Sarah Chambers 

The implications of behavioural economics for competition and consumer policy have received keen interest from academics and policy-makers in recent years. CCP researchers have approached this topic from the perspectives of economics, law, politics and business management in writing Behavioural Economics in Competition and Consumer Policy, which reflects the Centre’s interest, expertise and multidisciplinary approach to policy-making.

The book draws on researchers’ insights, based on surveys, experiments, theoretical work and market case studies, into specific behavioural issues and how these may or may not be resolved by intervention. The book’s intended audiences are policy-makers and practitioners who may be weighing up whether and how to take the evidence on behavioural traits into account when considering intervention in markets. The book has been written to make it accessible to a wide range of readers, whether in public, private or third sector organisations. It comprises an Introduction and Glossary followed by eight chapters that include real-world case studies. It can be read as an introduction to the area, or as a reminder and a reference point to the more specialised analytical studies that are available.

See on competitionpolicy.ac.uk

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08
Nov
13

Behavioural Economics in Competition and Consumer Policy

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Click one of the images to download a copy of Behavioural Economics in Competition and Consumer Policy (pdf: colour 2.89MB / grayscale 3.01MB)

“This book summarises the most significant developments in thinking in this area: for some it will be an accessible introduction, for others a reminder and a reference point to the more detailed analytical studies that are available.” – Sarah Chambers 

The implications of behavioural economics for competition and consumer policy have received keen interest from academics and policy-makers in recent years. CCP researchers have approached this topic from the perspectives of economics, law, politics and business management in writing Behavioural Economics in Competition and Consumer Policy, which reflects the Centre’s interest, expertise and multidisciplinary approach to policy-making.

The book draws on researchers’ insights, based on surveys, experiments, theoretical work and market case studies, into specific behavioural issues and how these may or may not be resolved by intervention. The book’s intended audiences are policy-makers and practitioners who may be weighing up whether and how to take the evidence on behavioural traits into account when considering intervention in markets. The book has been written to make it accessible to a wide range of readers, whether in public, private or third sector organisations. It comprises an Introduction and Glossary followed by eight chapters that include real-world case studies. It can be read as an introduction to the area, or as a reminder and a reference point to the more specialised analytical studies that are available.

See on competitionpolicy.ac.uk

08
Nov
13

Les behavioral economics sont-elles un revamping sale des théories pavloviennes?

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

S’il y a peu de doute sur l’invisibilité des variables constitutives d’une expérience de marque, l’effet de mode dont bénéfice l’économie comportementale a le goût d’une régression du point de vue …

See on notrelienquotidien.com

08
Nov
13

Les behavioral economics sont-elles un revamping sale des théories pavloviennes?

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

S’il y a peu de doute sur l’invisibilité des variables constitutives d’une expérience de marque, l’effet de mode dont bénéfice l’économie comportementale a le goût d’une régression du point de vue …

See on notrelienquotidien.com

08
Nov
13

Schafer: Here’s how our stupid choices may be rational

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

The marketing professor Vladas Griskevicius thinks we humans are not nearly as stupid as he once thought.

Yes, we can drop $3,200 on engagement rings when many marriages end in divorce or spend $5,000 to $7,000 more on a Toyota Prius hybrid than a fuel-efficient conventional car, but he said that we have perfectly rational reasons for doing so.

Not that we really understand why these choices were rational, because we probably didn’t get that our brains were trying to achieve some deep-seated evolutionary goal.

Griskevicius teaches at the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management and was trained as a psychologist, and his writing partner in a new book coming out next week, Doug Kenrick, is a psychology professor at Arizona State. Their term “deep rationality” is the key idea in their entertaining and informative book called “The Rational Animal: How Evolution Made Us Smarter Than We Think.”

 

Read more at http://www.startribune.com/business/221574551.html#mJBW0VbYmuRl1GmI.99

See on www.startribune.com

08
Nov
13

Schafer: Here’s how our stupid choices may be rational

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

The marketing professor Vladas Griskevicius thinks we humans are not nearly as stupid as he once thought.

Yes, we can drop $3,200 on engagement rings when many marriages end in divorce or spend $5,000 to $7,000 more on a Toyota Prius hybrid than a fuel-efficient conventional car, but he said that we have perfectly rational reasons for doing so.

Not that we really understand why these choices were rational, because we probably didn’t get that our brains were trying to achieve some deep-seated evolutionary goal.

Griskevicius teaches at the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management and was trained as a psychologist, and his writing partner in a new book coming out next week, Doug Kenrick, is a psychology professor at Arizona State. Their term “deep rationality” is the key idea in their entertaining and informative book called “The Rational Animal: How Evolution Made Us Smarter Than We Think.”

 

Read more at http://www.startribune.com/business/221574551.html#mJBW0VbYmuRl1GmI.99

See on startribune.com




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