Archivio per 28 novembre 2013

28
Nov
13

Cass Sunstein on making government simpler, not smaller

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

As head of the White House office that deals with government regulation under President Obama, Cass Sunstein pushed for fewer rules and lower costs. His new book lays out a path for simpler, if not smaller, government going forward. 

Whenever a federal agency sets new standards, say about the environment, or the financial industry, there’s an office inside the White House that has to put the final seal of approval on those regulations. It’s called OIRA (pronounced, “Oh, Ira”) – theOffice of Information and Regulatory Affairs.

Up until last year, Cass Sunstein ran that office for President Obama. And he’s got a new book about making government, and its rules, work more elegantly. It’s called “Simpler”.

“Think of a large company which is not going to get smaller. It shouldn’t. It should grow. But it can get simpler. It can make the experience for its own employees and for its customers easier,” Sunstein says. “My suggestion is that governments can serve their citizens a lot better if they get simpler." 

The current regulatory system in the United States is undoubtedly complicated, with state and local agencies issuing their own rules. That’s in addition to the sometimes conflicting policies coming out of multiple federal agencies. At Sunstein’s former post, OIRA, the focus is on negotiating and solving those potential conflicts.

That can lead to criticism that the office is a convenient place for Presidents to allow inconvenient rules to wither away. Sunstein doesn’t agree with that characterization.

See on marketplace.org

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28
Nov
13

Cass Sunstein on making government simpler, not smaller

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

As head of the White House office that deals with government regulation under President Obama, Cass Sunstein pushed for fewer rules and lower costs. His new book lays out a path for simpler, if not smaller, government going forward. 

Whenever a federal agency sets new standards, say about the environment, or the financial industry, there’s an office inside the White House that has to put the final seal of approval on those regulations. It’s called OIRA (pronounced, “Oh, Ira”) — theOffice of Information and Regulatory Affairs.

Up until last year, Cass Sunstein ran that office for President Obama. And he’s got a new book about making government, and its rules, work more elegantly. It’s called “Simpler”.

“Think of a large company which is not going to get smaller. It shouldn’t. It should grow. But it can get simpler. It can make the experience for its own employees and for its customers easier,” Sunstein says. “My suggestion is that governments can serve their citizens a lot better if they get simpler.” 

The current regulatory system in the United States is undoubtedly complicated, with state and local agencies issuing their own rules. That’s in addition to the sometimes conflicting policies coming out of multiple federal agencies. At Sunstein’s former post, OIRA, the focus is on negotiating and solving those potential conflicts.

That can lead to criticism that the office is a convenient place for Presidents to allow inconvenient rules to wither away. Sunstein doesn’t agree with that characterization.

See on www.marketplace.org

28
Nov
13

The Behavioural Economics of Big Data

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

It has long been recognised by those working with data that given a large enough sample size then most data points will have statistically significant correlations because at some level everything is related to everything else.  The psychologist Paul Meehl famously called this the ‘Crud Factor’  leading us to believe there are real relationships in the data where in fact the linkage is trivial.

Nate Silver made the same point when he warned that the number of ‘meaningful relationships’ is not increasing in step with the meteoric increase in amount of data available.  We simply generate a larger number of false positives, an issue endemic in data analytics which led John Ioannidis to suggest that two-thirds of the findings in medical journals were in fact not robust.

So if we cannot always rely on statistical techniques to cut through swathes of data to find meaningful patterns then where do we turn?  Naturally, we look to ourselves. Perhaps this is implicit in the discussion about the qualities of good data scientists, being ‘informed sceptics’ that balance judgement and analysis or that the key qualities are having a sense of wonder, a quantitative knack, persistence and technical skills.  However as soon as we recognise that humans are involved in the analysis of data we need to start exploring some of the frailties of our judgement for if there is one thing that behavioural economics has taught us, is that none of us is immune from misinterpreting data.

 
See on rwconnect.esomar.org

28
Nov
13

The Behavioural Economics of Big Data

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

It has long been recognised by those working with data that given a large enough sample size then most data points will have statistically significant correlations because at some level everything is related to everything else.  The psychologist Paul Meehl famously called this the ‘Crud Factor’  leading us to believe there are real relationships in the data where in fact the linkage is trivial.

Nate Silver made the same point when he warned that the number of ‘meaningful relationships’ is not increasing in step with the meteoric increase in amount of data available.  We simply generate a larger number of false positives, an issue endemic in data analytics which led John Ioannidis to suggest that two-thirds of the findings in medical journals were in fact not robust.

So if we cannot always rely on statistical techniques to cut through swathes of data to find meaningful patterns then where do we turn?  Naturally, we look to ourselves. Perhaps this is implicit in the discussion about the qualities of good data scientists, being ‘informed sceptics’ that balance judgement and analysis or that the key qualities are having a sense of wonder, a quantitative knack, persistence and technical skills.  However as soon as we recognise that humans are involved in the analysis of data we need to start exploring some of the frailties of our judgement for if there is one thing that behavioural economics has taught us, is that none of us is immune from misinterpreting data.

 
See on rwconnect.esomar.org

28
Nov
13

The relationship between innovation and subjective wellbein – Paul Dolanb, Robert Metcalfea,

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

a b s t r a c t
Innovation should improve people’s lives. The links made between innovation and subjective wellbeing (SWB) have, however, rarely been made. We use a representative survey of the British population and new primary data to explore the relationship between innovation and SWB. We show that creativity and SWB are correlated. This applies to questions related to self-reported creativity and for working in creative environments. More research is needed to determine the relative effects of each direction of causality in the relationship between innovation and SWB in the workplace and in life generally

See on pauldolan.co.uk

28
Nov
13

The relationship between innovation and subjective wellbein – Paul Dolanb, Robert Metcalfea,

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

a b s t r a c t
Innovation should improve people’s lives. The links made between innovation and subjective wellbeing (SWB) have, however, rarely been made. We use a representative survey of the British population and new primary data to explore the relationship between innovation and SWB. We show that creativity and SWB are correlated. This applies to questions related to self-reported creativity and for working in creative environments. More research is needed to determine the relative effects of each direction of causality in the relationship between innovation and SWB in the workplace and in life generally

See on pauldolan.co.uk

28
Nov
13

BSP Journal

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Behavioral Science & Policy

Behavioral Science & Policy is a new international, peer-reviewed journal that features short, accessible articles describing actionable policy applications of behavioral scientific research that serves the public interest. Articles submitted to BSP undergo a dual-review process: leading scholars from specific disciplinary areas review articles to assess their scientific rigor; at the same time, experts in relevant policy areas evaluate them for relevance and feasibility of implementation. Manuscripts that pass this dual-review are edited to ensure their accessibility to scientists, policy makers, and lay readers. BSP is not limited to a particular point of view or political ideology.

BSP is a publication of the Behavioral Science & Policy Association and the Brookings Institution Press.

 

See on bsp-journal.org




Time is real? I think not

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