Archivio per 3 giugno 2014

03
Giu
14

Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Significance

We show, via a massive (N = 689,003) experiment on Facebook, that emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. We provide experimental evidence that emotional contagion occurs without direct interaction between people (exposure to a friend expressing an emotion is sufficient), and in the complete absence of nonverbal cues.

Abstract

Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Emotional contagion is well established in laboratory experiments, with people transferring positive and negative emotions to others. Data from a large real-world social network, collected over a 20-y period suggests that longer-lasting moods (e.g., depression, happiness) can be transferred through networks [Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2008) BMJ 337:a2338], although the results are controversial. In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others’ positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people.

See on pnas.org

Annunci
03
Giu
14

Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Significance

We show, via a massive (N = 689,003) experiment on Facebook, that emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. We provide experimental evidence that emotional contagion occurs without direct interaction between people (exposure to a friend expressing an emotion is sufficient), and in the complete absence of nonverbal cues.

Abstract

Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Emotional contagion is well established in laboratory experiments, with people transferring positive and negative emotions to others. Data from a large real-world social network, collected over a 20-y period suggests that longer-lasting moods (e.g., depression, happiness) can be transferred through networks [Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2008) BMJ 337:a2338], although the results are controversial. In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others’ positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people.

See on www.pnas.org

03
Giu
14

Four ways to get employees to save for retirement

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Automatically enrolling workers into a savings plan and reminding them how much they can lose may just do the trick.

Last year, The New York Times ran a story about how teenagers were showing a surprising new reluctance to drive. That set us talking in my house. Both my husband and I recalled showing up at the DMV the day we became eligible for our respective permits/ What was this about, we wondered. Were today’s kids so comfortable having their parents haul them around that they didn’t feel the need to drive themselves? Did they feel so connected to their friends via ichat that there was no need to be in the same room? Or was it out of concern for the environment?

See on fortune.com

03
Giu
14

Four ways to get employees to save for retirement

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Automatically enrolling workers into a savings plan and reminding them how much they can lose may just do the trick.

Last year, The New York Times ran a story about how teenagers were showing a surprising new reluctance to drive. That set us talking in my house. Both my husband and I recalled showing up at the DMV the day we became eligible for our respective permits/ What was this about, we wondered. Were today’s kids so comfortable having their parents haul them around that they didn’t feel the need to drive themselves? Did they feel so connected to their friends via ichat that there was no need to be in the same room? Or was it out of concern for the environment?

 

See on fortune.com

03
Giu
14

Nudge economics: has push come to shove for a fashionable theory?

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

A rival psychologist has published a book debunking the behavioural economics of Daniel Kahneman and the men behind Nudge, who, along with the authors of Freakonomics, were once the PM’s pet thinkers. So how do you choose between them? In a TED talk in Monterey, California in February 2010, just before he came to power and had to make decisions, David Cameron was extremely keen to look like the future. “Politicians will only succeed if they actually try to treat people as they are, rather than as they would like them to be,” was his fresh-faced rallying cry, as he attempted to channel the spirit of Bobby Kennedy in an open-necked shirt. “If you combine this very simple, very conservative thought – go with the grain of human nature! – with all the advances in behavioural economics, I think we can achieve a real increase in wellbeing, in happiness, in a stronger society without necessarily having to spend a whole lot more money.This “revolution in government” would be brought about in particular, Cameron suggested, by his devotion to the theories of a group of thinkers who had come to establish and dominate a new self-help/psychology/economics corner of the bookshop, the decision-makers’ decision-makers. “We are working with these people,” Cameron said proudly, and flashed up a slide featuring three of them: Cass Sunstein and Richard Thaler, authors of the bestsellingNudge, and Daniel Kahneman, Nobel prize winner and author of the soon-to-be bestsellingThinking, Fast and Slow.

See on www.theguardian.com

03
Giu
14

Nudge economics: has push come to shove for a fashionable theory?

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

A rival psychologist has published a book debunking the behavioural economics of Daniel Kahneman and the men behind Nudge, who, along with the authors of Freakonomics, were once the PM’s pet thinkers. So how do you choose between them? In a TED talk in Monterey, California in February 2010, just before he came to power and had to make decisions, David Cameron was extremely keen to look like the future. “Politicians will only succeed if they actually try to treat people as they are, rather than as they would like them to be,” was his fresh-faced rallying cry, as he attempted to channel the spirit of Bobby Kennedy in an open-necked shirt. “If you combine this very simple, very conservative thought – go with the grain of human nature! – with all the advances in behavioural economics, I think we can achieve a real increase in wellbeing, in happiness, in a stronger society without necessarily having to spend a whole lot more money.This "revolution in government” would be brought about in particular, Cameron suggested, by his devotion to the theories of a group of thinkers who had come to establish and dominate a new self-help/psychology/economics corner of the bookshop, the decision-makers’ decision-makers. “We are working with these people,” Cameron said proudly, and flashed up a slide featuring three of them: Cass Sunstein and Richard Thaler, authors of the bestsellingNudge, and Daniel Kahneman, Nobel prize winner and author of the soon-to-be bestsellingThinking, Fast and Slow.

See on theguardian.com




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