Archivio per 10 giugno 2014

10
Giu
14

Irrational Labs’s Videos on Vimeo

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

When we understand human behavior, we can build and sell products that change lives.Defining Key BehaviorsPath of Least ResistancePower of EmotionSocial ProofLoss AversionConcretenessRelativityIncentivesPricing 
See on vimeo.com

10
Giu
14

Irrational Labs’s Videos on Vimeo

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

When we understand human behavior, we can build and sell products that change lives.Defining Key BehaviorsPath of Least ResistancePower of EmotionSocial ProofLoss AversionConcretenessRelativityIncentivesPricing 

 

See on vimeo.com

10
Giu
14

Scarpe: l’amore è a prima vista

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Un test neurocognitivo rivela che le donne sanno identificare i prodotti di successo in un solo secondo. La prova è in uno studio condotto in collaborazione con un’azienda di calzature austriaca. Il team di neuroscienziati guidato da Baldo ha monitorato le reazioni del cervello di quaranta donne alla visione di una collezione che includeva sia scarpe di successo sia scarpe che si erano rilevate un flop in termine di vendite. I risultati hanno dimostrano chiaramente come non solo la decisione di acquisto venga presa in un tempo rapidissimo, ma anche che è possibile prevedere il successo di una scarpa con un livello di accuratezza fino a oggi solo immaginabile. Infatti, la risposta del cervello delle donne sottoposte al test ha permesso di determinare i modelli di successo sul mercato con una precisione del 77%. Curiosamente, le scarpe in grado di suscitare nelle donne le emozioni più positive sono anche quelle che riscuoteranno maggior successo in termini di vendita. In un test analogo, ma eseguito solo tramite questionari che permettevano di indicare l’intenzione di acquisto, l’accuratezza della predizione si è fermata al 60%.

See on d.repubblica.it

10
Giu
14

Scarpe: l’amore è a prima vista

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Un test neurocognitivo rivela che le donne sanno identificare i prodotti di successo in un solo secondo. La prova è in uno studio condotto in collaborazione con un’azienda di calzature austriaca. Il team di neuroscienziati guidato da Baldo ha monitorato le reazioni del cervello di quaranta donne alla visione di una collezione che includeva sia scarpe di successo sia scarpe che si erano rilevate un flop in termine di vendite. I risultati hanno dimostrano chiaramente come non solo la decisione di acquisto venga presa in un tempo rapidissimo, ma anche che è possibile prevedere il successo di una scarpa con un livello di accuratezza fino a oggi solo immaginabile. Infatti, la risposta del cervello delle donne sottoposte al test ha permesso di determinare i modelli di successo sul mercato con una precisione del 77%. Curiosamente, le scarpe in grado di suscitare nelle donne le emozioni più positive sono anche quelle che riscuoteranno maggior successo in termini di vendita. In un test analogo, ma eseguito solo tramite questionari che permettevano di indicare l’intenzione di acquisto, l’accuratezza della predizione si è fermata al 60%.

See on d.repubblica.it

10
Giu
14

Neuromarketing: can science predict (and influence) our purchases?

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

In the 1950s, two scientists at McGill University accidentally discovered an area of the rodent brain now known as ‘the pleasure centre’. Given the opportunity to stimulate their own pleasure centres via a lever-activated electrical current, a group of rats pressed the lever over and over again, going without food and sleep, until many of them died from exhaustion.

Most humans are a little more complex than rats but we are still largely motivated by what makes us feel good, especially in relation to purchasing choices. In light of this, many major corporations are taking a special interest in understanding customers through the mechanics of the human brain. This is the emerging but fast-growing field of ‘neuromarketing’, which uses brain-tracking tools to determine why people prefer some products over others. 

See on blogs.bmj.com

10
Giu
14

Neuromarketing: can science predict (and influence) our purchases?

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

In the 1950s, two scientists at McGill University accidentally discovered an area of the rodent brain now known as ‘the pleasure centre’. Given the opportunity to stimulate their own pleasure centres via a lever-activated electrical current, a group of rats pressed the lever over and over again, going without food and sleep, until many of them died from exhaustion.

Most humans are a little more complex than rats but we are still largely motivated by what makes us feel good, especially in relation to purchasing choices. In light of this, many major corporations are taking a special interest in understanding customers through the mechanics of the human brain. This is the emerging but fast-growing field of ‘neuromarketing’, which uses brain-tracking tools to determine why people prefer some products over others. 

See on blogs.bmj.com

10
Giu
14

Six Things Education Can Learn From Neuroscience

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Neuroscience studies a very complex system: the brain. Much has been learned through formal research of the brain, especially due to the advent of brain imaging technologies which afford increased breadth of research using human subjects. That said, what we know remains very limited, given the complexities of both the organ and the practical application of research findings. 

However, we can point to six findings that give us new and profound insight into our grey matter. 

See on magazine.good.is

10
Giu
14

Six Things Education Can Learn From Neuroscience

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Neuroscience studies a very complex system: the brain. Much has been learned through formal research of the brain, especially due to the advent of brain imaging technologies which afford increased breadth of research using human subjects. That said, what we know remains very limited, given the complexities of both the organ and the practical application of research findings. 

However, we can point to six findings that give us new and profound insight into our grey matter. 

See on magazine.good.is

10
Giu
14

Politics of pushing: behavioural economics a revenue game-changer

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

T

About 18 months ago, the NSW Premier’s department quietly set up a small team with a unique brief. It was dubbed the “nudge” unit because its goal was to influence people’s behaviour using insights drawn from economics and psychology rather than regulation and red tape.

The plan drew on the relatively new discipline of behavioural economics that has challenged traditional assumptions about how consumers, and citizens, behave. Behavioural economists have drawn attention to human biases that cause people to make choices that seem contrary to their best interests.

The theory is that those same biases – such as shame, the desire to conform and even vanity – can also be used to nudge people to make superior choices that save governments and citizens time and money. The approach was made popular by University of Chicago professor Richard Thaler, who co-wrote the 2008 book Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth and Happiness.

The NSW government’s new nudge team – or the Behavioural Insights Unit as it’s officially known – began a series of trials to find out if the strategy would work in NSW.

 

See on www.theherald.com.au

10
Giu
14

Politics of pushing: behavioural economics a revenue game-changer

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

T

About 18 months ago, the NSW Premier’s department quietly set up a small team with a unique brief. It was dubbed the “nudge” unit because its goal was to influence people’s behaviour using insights drawn from economics and psychology rather than regulation and red tape.

The plan drew on the relatively new discipline of behavioural economics that has challenged traditional assumptions about how consumers, and citizens, behave. Behavioural economists have drawn attention to human biases that cause people to make choices that seem contrary to their best interests.

The theory is that those same biases – such as shame, the desire to conform and even vanity – can also be used to nudge people to make superior choices that save governments and citizens time and money. The approach was made popular by University of Chicago professor Richard Thaler, who co-wrote the 2008 book Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth and Happiness.

The NSW government’s new nudge team – or the Behavioural Insights Unit as it’s officially known – began a series of trials to find out if the strategy would work in NSW.

 

See on theherald.com.au




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