Archivio per 3 settembre 2014

03
Set
14

What is bounded rationality? – YouTube

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

The term “bounded rationality” was introduced by Nobel laureate Herbert Simon who asked, how do human beings reason when the conditions for rationality postulated by neoclassical economics theory are not met?” In this talk at the Summer Institute for Bounded Rationality 2014, Gerd Gigerenzer, Director of the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, will introduce how the fast-and-frugal heuristics research program has begun to answer Simon’s question. 

Fast-and-frugal heuristics are efficient cognitive strategies that ignore information, and stand in contrast to the classical view that heuristics are error-prone and thus sub-optimal. The research on the adaptive toolbox indicates that (i) individuals and organizations often rely on simple heuristics adaptively, and (ii) ignoring information can lead to more accurate decisions in uncertain environments.

This talk was presented at the Summer Institute for Bounded Rationality 2014, hosted by the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, Germany, from 10 to 17 June. The 2014 theme was “Simple Solutions for a Complex World”. The summer institute is an annual event that hosts young scientists from various countries and disciplines for a week of exchange about bounded rationality. 

For more information, visit https://www.mpib-berlin.mpg.de/en/res...

See on youtube.com

03
Set
14

From Theory to Practice: Applying Behavioral Economics to the Arts, Tessitura’s Innovator Series – YouTube

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Sara Billmann, Marketing & Communications Director for University Musical Society (UMS), University of Michigan presents “From Theory to Practice: Applying Behavioral Economics to the Arts” in this Innovator Series video from http://www.tessituranetwork.com.

The fields of behavioral economics and consumer psychology provide us with theories about why people behave the way they do. But do these theories work for the arts? Sara explores recent work by leading behavioral economists and how their research can become your reality.

In her role Sara oversees the strategic and creative campaigns for a 50-event season in classical music, theater, dance, jazz, and world music. She has recently overseen a rebranding of UMS, as well as the launch of umslobby.org, an interactive website that engages with audiences in new ways. She co-chaired the Major University Presenters Value and Impact Study (released in 2007). In 2010, she was invited to join 50 international arts professionals in the Salzburg Global Seminar on “Performing Arts in Lean Times: Opportunities for Reinvention”.

Tessitura’s Innovator Series is an ongoing program of brief & inspiring presentations by industry innovators, each focused on a single theme with the potential to advance the reach & relevance of arts & culture in the world. 

Like Tessitura’s Innovator Series Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/TNinnovator ;
Follow Tessitura Network on Twitter @TessNetwork.

See on youtube.com

03
Set
14

In conversation: George Loewenstein and Rory Sutherland (London Behavioural Economics Network) – YouTube

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

To celebrate the second anniversary of the London Behavioural Economics Network, we organised a two-way debate with leading behavioural economics scholar George Loewenstein and advertising guru Rory Sutherland on 23rd April. 

This recording covers the first hour of the conversation, and the final 10mins are here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=su2ND...

See on youtube.com

03
Set
14

the Behavioral Economics of Extreme Poverty

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Why do the poor remain poor? Sendhil Mullainathan’s recent research shows that living under conditions of extreme poverty – or scarcity – makes it harder for the poor to do the very things that could help them escape poverty. That is, scarcity makes it hard for the poor to make the good decisions about their own health, nutrition and investments, among other issues.

Mullainathan explores the implications of his research on scarcity and behavioral economics for how we think about and tackle the problem of persistent, extreme poverty and poor health and nutrition in the developing world. His remarks are followed by a panel discussion on how these lessons can inform development policies and programs.

This CGD event, held in partnership with the U.S. Agency for International Development, is the third in a series USAID has organized to develop discourse and substantively engage the external community on President Obama’s commitment to eradicate extreme poverty within a generation. USAID will use the questions and information from these conversations to inform their approach to ending extreme poverty.

See on youtube.com

03
Set
14

Could Neuroeconomics Help Prevent Market Crashes?

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

What is going on in people’s brains when they are buying and selling assets during a bubble and a crash? Award-winning behavioral economist Colin Camerer discusses his pioneering research during the Subjective Probability, Utility and Decision-Making Conference held at IESE Barcelona in August 2013.

See on youtube.com

03
Set
14

Behavioral Economics and Wellness

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Sibson VP Christopher Goldsmith discusses the positive effects that behavioral economics can have on wellness.

See on youtube.com

03
Set
14

The Agricultural Origins of Time Preference

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Abstract: This research explores the origins of the distribution of time preference across regions. It advances the hypothesis, and establishes empirically, that geographical variations in the incentives to delay consumption in favor of lucrative investment opportunities have had a persistent effect on the distribution of long-term orientation across societies. In particular, exploiting a natural experiment associated with the Columbian Exchange, the research establishes that agro-climatic characteristics in the pre-industrial era that were conducive to higher return to agricultural investment, triggered selection and learning processes that had a persistent positive effect on the prevalence of long-term orientation in the contemporary era.

See on brown.edu




Time is real? I think not

settembre: 2014
L M M G V S D
« Ago   Ott »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  

Commenti recenti

Lorenzo Bosio su Un testo che trascende le sue…

Inserisci il tuo indirizzo e-mail per iscriverti a questo blog e ricevere notifiche di nuovi messaggi per e-mail.

Segui assieme ad altri 1.160 follower

Latest Tweets


%d blogger hanno fatto clic su Mi Piace per questo: