Archivio per 11 ottobre 2014

11
Ott
14

Victor Ricciardi talks about his book Investor Behavior: The Psychology of Financial Planning and Investing – MoneyScience’s blog – MoneyScience

Victor Ricciardi is a Finance Professor at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland and co-editor (with Kent Baker) of the new book Investor Behavior: The Psychology of Financial Planning and Investing. You can buy this book and claim 30% off your copy with our promo code MON30 when ordering direct through Wiley here. Read a sample chapterhere.

Jacob Bettany: You and your co-editor H. Kent Baker are very well known to many members of the MoneyScience community through your work in behavioural finance. For the benefit of those who don’t know you, could you begin by introducing yourself and telling us a little bit about Kent as well?

Victor Ricciardi: Kent Baker is one of the most prolific individuals in finance in terms of the academic side of financial history – he has a research track record that dates back about 45 years in the academic literature. He has done it all, across a wide range of every area of finance. Kent has published over 15 books of this type, where the content of the book is a summary of the literature. He has a knack for doing this type of project and he was a great person to work on this type of endeavour. Kent has also embraced the behavioural finance viewpoint.

For myself, I was introduced to behavioural finance by a mentor through my graduate studies about 15 years ago. At the time, there was no book on behavioural finance. The first book on the topic was Hersh Shefrin’s book, Beyond Greed and Fear, and since then, in the last 12-13 years, there have been about 15-20 books in the area. As I was researching several different areas, I started to focus on risk perception (the psychology of risk) and what is nice about this topic is that it’s based on survey research and laboratory experiments. The psychology of risk intertwines with many different themes in behavioural finance and this provided me an excellent insight of all the different aspects of behavioural finance.

Source: www.moneyscience.com

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

11
Ott
14

Victor Ricciardi talks about his book Investor Behavior: The Psychology of Financial Planning and Investing – MoneyScience’s blog – MoneyScience

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Victor Ricciardi is a Finance Professor at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland and co-editor (with Kent Baker) of the new book Investor Behavior: The Psychology of Financial Planning and Investing. You can buy this book and claim 30% off your copy with our promo code MON30 when ordering direct through Wiley here. Read a sample chapterhere.

Jacob Bettany: You and your co-editor H. Kent Baker are very well known to many members of the MoneyScience community through your work in behavioural finance. For the benefit of those who don’t know you, could you begin by introducing yourself and telling us a little bit about Kent as well?

Victor Ricciardi: Kent Baker is one of the most prolific individuals in finance in terms of the academic side of financial history – he has a research track record that dates back about 45 years in the academic literature. He has done it all, across a wide range of every area of finance. Kent has published over 15 books of this type, where the content of the book is a summary of the literature. He has a knack for doing this type of project and he was a great person to work on this type of endeavour. Kent has also embraced the behavioural finance viewpoint.

For myself, I was introduced to behavioural finance by a mentor through my graduate studies about 15 years ago. At the time, there was no book on behavioural finance. The first book on the topic was Hersh Shefrin’s book, Beyond Greed and Fear, and since then, in the last 12-13 years, there have been about 15-20 books in the area. As I was researching several different areas, I started to focus on risk perception (the psychology of risk) and what is nice about this topic is that it’s based on survey research and laboratory experiments. The psychology of risk intertwines with many different themes in behavioural finance and this provided me an excellent insight of all the different aspects of behavioural finance.

See on moneyscience.com

11
Ott
14

Extreme Rituals Promote Prosociality

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Extreme Rituals Promote Prosociality

Psychological ScienceShort Report Extreme rituals entail excessive costs without apparentbenefits, which raises an evolutionary cost problem(Irons, 2001). It is argued that such intense rituals enhancesocial cohesion and promote cooperative behaviors(Atran & Henrich, 2010; Durkheim, 1912). However,direct evidence for the relation between ritual intensityand prosociality is lacking. Using economic measuresof generosity and contextually relevant indicators ofgroup identity in a real-world setting, we evaluated pro-social effects from naturally occurring rituals that variedin severity. 
See on academia.edu

11
Ott
14

Extreme Rituals Promote Prosociality

Extreme Rituals Promote Prosociality

Psychological ScienceShort Report Extreme rituals entail excessive costs without apparentbenefits, which raises an evolutionary cost problem(Irons, 2001). It is argued that such intense rituals enhancesocial cohesion and promote cooperative behaviors(Atran & Henrich, 2010; Durkheim, 1912). However,direct evidence for the relation between ritual intensityand prosociality is lacking. Using economic measuresof generosity and contextually relevant indicators ofgroup identity in a real-world setting, we evaluated pro-social effects from naturally occurring rituals that variedin severity. 

Source: www.academia.edu

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

11
Ott
14

Discovered: How The Brain Repairs Itself After a Stroke — PsyBlog

These cells are the key to recovery from a stroke.

A mechanism by which the brain creates new nerve cells to help it recover from a stroke has been discovered.The research could eventually lead to new therapies for stroke sufferers, as well as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease. Strokes are caused by blood vessels in the brain getting blocked by a clot — this causes nerve cells to die. The death of vital brain cells can lead to devastating effects on people’s thinking, motor and sensory abilities. The new study, though, shows exactly how the brain recovers from these insults and might point the way to new treatments.

Source: www.spring.org.uk

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

11
Ott
14

Discovered: How The Brain Repairs Itself After a Stroke — PsyBlog

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

These cells are the key to recovery from a stroke.

A mechanism by which the brain creates new nerve cells to help it recover from a stroke has been discovered.The research could eventually lead to new therapies for stroke sufferers, as well as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease. Strokes are caused by blood vessels in the brain getting blocked by a clot — this causes nerve cells to die. The death of vital brain cells can lead to devastating effects on people’s thinking, motor and sensory abilities. The new study, though, shows exactly how the brain recovers from these insults and might point the way to new treatments.

See on spring.org.uk

11
Ott
14

The quest to understand consciousness

Every morning we wake up and regain consciousness — that is a marvelous fact — but what exactly is it that we regain? Neuroscientist Antonio Damasio uses this simple question to give us a glimpse into how our brains create our sense of self.

Source: www.ted.com

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond




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