Archivio per 29 ottobre 2014

29
Ott
14

Il peso delle informazioni subliminali sulle decisioni – Le Scienze

Una conferma dell’influenza delle percezioni inconsce sui processi decisionali viene da uno dei pochi studi sperimentali ad affrontare il problema. Dall’analisi dei dati risulta che le informazioni raccolte in modo inconscio possono aumentare o diminuire la precisione e la velocità delle nostre decisioni,  ma quelle di cui siamo consapevoli hanno un peso maggiore. Le informazioni elaborate inconsciamente possono influenzare – nel bene e nel male – la precisione delle nostre decisioni, ma “pesano” meno di quelle di cui si è consapevoli. A darne una conferma sperimentale è una ricerca condotta da psicologi dell’University of New South Wales, in Australia, che firmano un articolo pubblicato sui “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences”. 

Source: www.lescienze.it

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

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29
Ott
14

Il peso delle informazioni subliminali sulle decisioni – Le Scienze

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Una conferma dell’influenza delle percezioni inconsce sui processi decisionali viene da uno dei pochi studi sperimentali ad affrontare il problema. Dall’analisi dei dati risulta che le informazioni raccolte in modo inconscio possono aumentare o diminuire la precisione e la velocità delle nostre decisioni,  ma quelle di cui siamo consapevoli hanno un peso maggiore. Le informazioni elaborate inconsciamente possono influenzare – nel bene e nel male – la precisione delle nostre decisioni, ma “pesano” meno di quelle di cui si è consapevoli. A darne una conferma sperimentale è una ricerca condotta da psicologi dell’University of New South Wales, in Australia, che firmano un articolo pubblicato sui “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences”. 

See on lescienze.it

29
Ott
14

Activity in Dendrites is Critical in Memory Formation

Why do we remember some things and not others? In a unique imaging study, two Northwestern University researchers have discovered how neurons in the brain might allow some experiences to be remembered while others are forgotten. It turns out, if you want to remember something about your environment, you better involve your dendrites.

Using a high-resolution, one-of-a-kind microscope, Daniel A. Dombeck and Mark E. J. Sheffield peered into the brain of a living animal and saw exactly what was happening in individual neurons called place cells as the animal navigated a virtual reality maze.

The scientists found that, contrary to current thought, the activity of a neuron’s cell body and its dendrites can be different. They observed that when cell bodies were activated but the dendrites were not activated during an animal’s experience, a lasting memory of that experience was not formed by the neurons. This suggests that the cell body seems to represent ongoing experience, while dendrites, the treelike branches of a neuron, help to store that experience as a memory.

Source: myscienceacademy.org

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

29
Ott
14

Activity in Dendrites is Critical in Memory Formation

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Why do we remember some things and not others? In a unique imaging study, two Northwestern University researchers have discovered how neurons in the brain might allow some experiences to be remembered while others are forgotten. It turns out, if you want to remember something about your environment, you better involve your dendrites.

Using a high-resolution, one-of-a-kind microscope, Daniel A. Dombeck and Mark E. J. Sheffield peered into the brain of a living animal and saw exactly what was happening in individual neurons called place cells as the animal navigated a virtual reality maze.

The scientists found that, contrary to current thought, the activity of a neuron’s cell body and its dendrites can be different. They observed that when cell bodies were activated but the dendrites were not activated during an animal’s experience, a lasting memory of that experience was not formed by the neurons. This suggests that the cell body seems to represent ongoing experience, while dendrites, the treelike branches of a neuron, help to store that experience as a memory.

See on myscienceacademy.org

29
Ott
14

How to Stop Being Jealous of Other People’s Success

You can tell a lot about a person by how they react to other people’s happiness and success.

For many, we seem to get easily threatened when we see other people doing better than us in some area in life. We find it hard to be happy for them, but instead we have feelings of jealousy and envy.

I remember when I was young and whenever I used to see my peers succeed at something – whether it be grades, sports, relationships, jobs, etc. – I used to always try to downplay it. Good grades? “Lonely nerd.” Good at sports? “Dumb jock.” Good job? “Sold his soul to corporate America.”

But the root of all jealousy is ultimately low self-esteem.

I’d see a friend’s band play a show and I would think, “They aren’t really that good. They make boring music. I could do better.” But the truth is that it was better than anything I could’ve done at the time. I was just protecting my ego from getting too hurt.

Source: www.theemotionmachine.com

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

29
Ott
14

How to Stop Being Jealous of Other People’s Success

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

You can tell a lot about a person by how they react to other people’s happiness and success.

For many, we seem to get easily threatened when we see other people doing better than us in some area in life. We find it hard to be happy for them, but instead we have feelings of jealousy and envy.

I remember when I was young and whenever I used to see my peers succeed at something – whether it be grades, sports, relationships, jobs, etc. – I used to always try to downplay it. Good grades? “Lonely nerd.” Good at sports? “Dumb jock.” Good job? “Sold his soul to corporate America.”

But the root of all jealousy is ultimately low self-esteem.

I’d see a friend’s band play a show and I would think, “They aren’t really that good. They make boring music. I could do better.” But the truth is that it was better than anything I could’ve done at the time. I was just protecting my ego from getting too hurt.

See on theemotionmachine.com

29
Ott
14

We Are All Confident Idiots

The trouble with ignorance is that it feels so much like expertise. A leading researcher on the psychology of human wrongness sets us straight.

The trouble with ignorance is that it feels so much like expertise. A leading researcher on the psychology of human wrongness sets us straight. 

Last March, during the enormous South by Southwest music festival in Austin, Texas, the late-night talk show Jimmy Kimmel Live! sent a camera crew out into the streets to catch hipsters bluffing. “People who go to music festivals pride themselves on knowing who the next acts are,” Kimmel said to his studio audience, “even if they don’t actually know who the new acts are.” So the host had his crew ask festival-goers for their thoughts about bands that don’t exist.

“The big buzz on the street,” said one of Kimmel’s interviewers to a man wearing thick-framed glasses and a whimsical T-shirt, “is Contact Dermatitis. Do you think he has what it takes to really make it to the big time?”

“Absolutely,” came the dazed fan’s reply

Source: www.psmag.com

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond




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