Archivio per 23 novembre 2014

23
Nov
14

Music’s Amazing Effect on Long-Term Memory and Mental Abilities In General

The fascinating effect of music on people’s cognitive abilities.

Professional musicians show superior long-term memory compared with non-musicians, a new study finds.

Their brains are also capable of much faster neural responses in key areas of the brain related to decision-making, memory and attention.

The results were presented at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in Washington, DC (Schaeffer et al., 2014).

Professional musicians show superior long-term memory compared with non-musicians, a new study finds.

Source: www.spring.org.uk

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

23
Nov
14

Music’s Amazing Effect on Long-Term Memory and Mental Abilities In General

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

The fascinating effect of music on people’s cognitive abilities.

Professional musicians show superior long-term memory compared with non-musicians, a new study finds.

Their brains are also capable of much faster neural responses in key areas of the brain related to decision-making, memory and attention.

The results were presented at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in Washington, DC (Schaeffer et al., 2014).

Professional musicians show superior long-term memory compared with non-musicians, a new study finds.
See on spring.org.uk

23
Nov
14

Fear vs. Personality Type

There are many factors to fear. The most important one however (And widely unknown) is the shocking fact that our capacity to experience fear is directly correlated with our capacity to experience love. In other words, we can’t suppress fear while still maintaining the ability to experience great love. Numbing one or ignoring one, equally affects the other.

Interestingly enough, there is some science behind it. It’s long been known that oxytocin is the neurohypophysial hormone associated with love. For example, large amounts of oxytocin are released during and after child birth. Some say, to prevent the mother from harming the baby as a result of the agony of child birth. More recent studies are beginning to show that oxytocin also plays a large role in fear. This may explain why suppressing fears also reduces our ability to love and connect with others. 

The more of our authentic selves we suppress, the less fear AND love we are vulnerable to experience, suppression being the opposite of vulnerability.

Source: www.scottrodriguez.com

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

23
Nov
14

Fear vs. Personality Type

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

There are many factors to fear. The most important one however (And widely unknown) is the shocking fact that our capacity to experience fear is directly correlated with our capacity to experience love. In other words, we can’t suppress fear while still maintaining the ability to experience great love. Numbing one or ignoring one, equally affects the other.

Interestingly enough, there is some science behind it. It’s long been known that oxytocin is the neurohypophysial hormone associated with love. For example, large amounts of oxytocin are released during and after child birth. Some say, to prevent the mother from harming the baby as a result of the agony of child birth. More recent studies are beginning to show that oxytocin also plays a large role in fear. This may explain why suppressing fears also reduces our ability to love and connect with others. 

The more of our authentic selves we suppress, the less fear AND love we are vulnerable to experience, suppression being the opposite of vulnerability.

See on scottrodriguez.com

23
Nov
14

Economic complexity: A different way to look at the economy

By W. Brian Arthur; External Professor, Santa Fe Institute; Visiting Researcher, Palo Alto Research Center. 

Economics is a stately subject, one that has altered little since its modern foundations were laid in Victorian times. Now it is changing radically. Standard economics is suddenly being challenged by a number of new approaches: behavioral economics, neuroeconomics, new institutional economics. One of the new approaches came to life at the Santa Fe Institute: complexity economics.

Complexity economics got its start in 1987 when a now-famous conference of scientists and economists convened by physicist Philip Anderson and economist Kenneth Arrow met to discuss the economy as an evolving complex system. That conference gave birth a year later to the Institute’s first research program – the Economy as an Evolving Complex System – and I was asked to lead this. That program in turn has gone on to lay down a new and different way to look at the economy.

Source: medium.com

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

23
Nov
14

Economic complexity: A different way to look at the economy

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

By W. Brian Arthur; External Professor, Santa Fe Institute; Visiting Researcher, Palo Alto Research Center. 

Economics is a stately subject, one that has altered little since its modern foundations were laid in Victorian times. Now it is changing radically. Standard economics is suddenly being challenged by a number of new approaches: behavioral economics, neuroeconomics, new institutional economics. One of the new approaches came to life at the Santa Fe Institute: complexity economics.

Complexity economics got its start in 1987 when a now-famous conference of scientists and economists convened by physicist Philip Anderson and economist Kenneth Arrow met to discuss the economy as an evolving complex system. That conference gave birth a year later to the Institute’s first research program – the Economy as an Evolving Complex System – and I was asked to lead this. That program in turn has gone on to lay down a new and different way to look at the economy.

See on medium.com

23
Nov
14

The Illusion of Confidence — Behavioral Economics

As told by Daniel Kahneman 

A friend recommend me the book Thinking, Fast and Slow when I asked him for a good read in the field of behavioral science — I am an entry level enthusiast. Half way thru it, everything has made sense to me till now, as has the concept of confidence/overconfidence as discussed by the author.

The less we know about something, say, a subject or incident, the more confident we feel about it. It’s like a jigsaw puzzle. It’s easy to fill a jigsaw puzzle if there are less pieces in it. The puzzle is complete or almost complete with just a few pieces.

We can form a coherent story if we have less data points. And as soon as we form a coherent story, we feel it’s true — which might or might not be the case. A coherent story is the key. We believe it and hence feel confident about it. Sometimes overconfident. And rightly said — it’s an illusion.

P.S. No takeaway from this post. Just a feeling of oh, that’s so right is all you get after reading it.

Source: medium.com

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond




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