Archivio per dicembre 2014

29
Dic
14

Analisi del 2014

I folletti delle statistiche di WordPress.com hanno preparato un rapporto annuale 2014 per questo blog.

Ecco un estratto:

Un “cable car” di San Francisco contiene 60 passeggeri. Questo blog è stato visto circa 2.300 volte nel 2014. Se fosse un cable car, ci vorrebbero circa 38 viaggi per trasportare altrettante persone.

Clicca qui per vedere il rapporto completo.

29
Dic
14

Implicit Egotis

http://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fnew.dixie.edu%2Fhumanities%2FFile%2FImplicit%2520Egotism.pdf&embedded=true

Implicit Egotism

ABSTRACT—People gravitate toward people, places, and things that resemble the self. We refer to this tendency as implicit egotism, and we suggest that it reflects an unconscious process that is grounded in people’s favorable self-associations. We review recent archival and experimental research that supports this position, highlighting evidence that rules out alternate explanations and distinguishes implicit egotism from closely related ideas such
as mere exposure. Taken together, the evidence suggests that implicit egotism is an implicit judgmental consequence of people’s positive self-associations. We conclude by identifying promising areas for future research.

Source: new.dixie.edu

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

29
Dic
14

Implicit Egotis

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Implicit Egotism

ABSTRACT—People gravitate toward people, places, and things that resemble the self. We refer to this tendency as implicit egotism, and we suggest that it reflects an unconscious process that is grounded in people’s favorable self-associations. We review recent archival and experimental research that supports this position, highlighting evidence that rules out alternate explanations and distinguishes implicit egotism from closely related ideas such
as mere exposure. Taken together, the evidence suggests that implicit egotism is an implicit judgmental consequence of people’s positive self-associations. We conclude by identifying promising areas for future research.

See on new.dixie.edu

29
Dic
14

Why rejection hurts: a common neural alarm system for physical and social pain

http://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fsanlab.psych.ucla.edu%2Fpapers_files%2FEisenberger_TICS%2520%282004%29.pdf&embedded=true

Why rejection hurts: a common neural alarm system for physical and social pain

Numerous languages characterize ‘social pain’, the feelings resulting from social estrangement, with words typically reserved for describing physical pain (‘broken heart’, ‘broken bones’) and perhaps for good reason. It has been suggested that, in mammalian species, the social-attachment system borrowed the computations
of the pain system to prevent the potentially harmful consequences of social separation. Mounting evidence from the animal lesion and human neuroimaging literatures suggests that physical and social pain overlap in their underlying neural circuitry and computational
processes. We review evidence suggesting that the anterior cingulate cortex plays a key role in the physical–social pain overlap. We also suggest that the physical–social pain circuitry might share components of a broader neural alarm system.

Source: sanlab.psych.ucla.edu

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

29
Dic
14

Why rejection hurts: a common neural alarm system for physical and social pain

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Why rejection hurts: a common neural alarm system for physical and social pain

Numerous languages characterize ‘social pain’, the feelings resulting from social estrangement, with words typically reserved for describing physical pain (‘broken heart’, ‘broken bones’) and perhaps for good reason. It has been suggested that, in mammalian species, the social-attachment system borrowed the computations
of the pain system to prevent the potentially harmful consequences of social separation. Mounting evidence from the animal lesion and human neuroimaging literatures suggests that physical and social pain overlap in their underlying neural circuitry and computational
processes. We review evidence suggesting that the anterior cingulate cortex plays a key role in the physical–social pain overlap. We also suggest that the physical–social pain circuitry might share components of a broader neural alarm system.

See on sanlab.psych.ucla.edu

29
Dic
14

Two Words That Change How People Think of You – Neuromarketing

Almost certainly, there are two words that have been drilled into you as important since the day you started talking.

Now, research shows these words have surprising power over how others perceive you.

The words, as you may have guessed, are “Thank you.” Your mother always told you to thank people who helped you, and, as with many things in life, it turns out that Mom was right.

Researchers in Australia have published a study showing that expressing gratitude changes how others perceive you.

Subjects, in this case college students, were asked to assist a high school student “mentee” by reading a college application essay. All subjects then received a hand-written note, ostensibly from the student they helped. Half of the notes included the sentence, “Thank you SO much for all the time and effort you put into doing that for me!”

– See more at: http://www.neurosciencemarketing.com/blog/articles/two-words.htm#sthash.2Z2v1iKu.dpuf

Source: www.neurosciencemarketing.com

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

29
Dic
14

Two Words That Change How People Think of You – Neuromarketing

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Almost certainly, there are two words that have been drilled into you as important since the day you started talking.

Now, research shows these words have surprising power over how others perceive you.

The words, as you may have guessed, are “Thank you.” Your mother always told you to thank people who helped you, and, as with many things in life, it turns out that Mom was right.

Researchers in Australia have published a study showing that expressing gratitude changes how others perceive you.

Subjects, in this case college students, were asked to assist a high school student “mentee” by reading a college application essay. All subjects then received a hand-written note, ostensibly from the student they helped. Half of the notes included the sentence, “Thank you SO much for all the time and effort you put into doing that for me!”

– See more at: http://www.neurosciencemarketing.com/blog/articles/two-words.htm#sthash.2Z2v1iKu.dpuf

See on neurosciencemarketing.com




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