Archivio per 7 dicembre 2014

07
Dic
14

Visualize Prospect Theory – Decision Science News

Cool Prospect Theory Visualizer draws the curves for you. Made with R/Shiny. 

INTERACTIVE R TOOL FOR GRAPHING PROSPECT THEORY AND MORE 

Dan Wall from Columbia University’s Center for the Decision Sciences (*) writes in that he’s developed a new Web app using Shiny and RStudio. It allows users to edit Prospect Theory and Quasi-Hyperbolic Time Discounting Parameters and see the resulting changes to the graphs.

Try it out!

https://decisionsciences.shinyapps.io/Shiny/pt_qtd_shiny.Rmd

Source: www.decisionsciencenews.com

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Annunci
07
Dic
14

Visualize Prospect Theory – Decision Science News

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Cool Prospect Theory Visualizer draws the curves for you. Made with R/Shiny. 

INTERACTIVE R TOOL FOR GRAPHING PROSPECT THEORY AND MORE 

Dan Wall from Columbia University’s Center for the Decision Sciences (*) writes in that he’s developed a new Web app using Shiny and RStudio. It allows users to edit Prospect Theory and Quasi-Hyperbolic Time Discounting Parameters and see the resulting changes to the graphs.

Try it out!

https://decisionsciences.shinyapps.io/Shiny/pt_qtd_shiny.Rmd

See on decisionsciencenews.com

07
Dic
14

Nudges.gov: Behavioral Economics and Regulation by Cass R. Sunstein :: SSRN

Abstract:      

#Behavioral-economics is influencing regulatory initiatives in many nations, including the United States and the United Kingdom. The role of behavioral economics is likely to increase in the next generation, especially in light of the growing interest in low-cost, choice-preserving regulatory tools. Choice architecture — including default rules, simplification, norms, and disclosure — can affect outcomes even if material incentives are not involved. For example, default rules can have an even larger effect than significant economic incentives. Behavioral economics has helped to inform recent and emerging reforms in areas that include savings, finance, distracted driving, energy, climate change, obesity, education, poverty, health, and the environment.

Source: papers.ssrn.com

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

07
Dic
14

Nudges.gov: Behavioral Economics and Regulation by Cass R. Sunstein :: SSRN

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Abstract:      

#Behavioral-economics is influencing regulatory initiatives in many nations, including the United States and the United Kingdom. The role of behavioral economics is likely to increase in the next generation, especially in light of the growing interest in low-cost, choice-preserving regulatory tools. Choice architecture – including default rules, simplification, norms, and disclosure – can affect outcomes even if material incentives are not involved. For example, default rules can have an even larger effect than significant economic incentives. Behavioral economics has helped to inform recent and emerging reforms in areas that include savings, finance, distracted driving, energy, climate change, obesity, education, poverty, health, and the environment.
See on papers.ssrn.com

07
Dic
14

Statement on Prediction Markets by Kenneth J. Arrow, Shyam Sunder, Robert Forsythe, Robert E. Litan, Eric Zitzewitz, Michael Gorham, Robert W. Hahn, Robin Hanson, Daniel Kahneman, John O. Ledyard, …

Prediction markets are markets for contracts that yield payments based on the outcome of an uncertain future event, such as a presidential election. Using these markets as forecasting tools could substantially improve decision making in the private and public sectors. 

We argue that U.S. regulators should lower barriers to the creation and design of prediction markets by creating a safe harbor for certain types of small stakes markets. We believe our proposed change has the potential to stimulate innovation in the design and use of prediction markets throughout the economy, and in the process to provide information that will benefit the private sector and government alike. 

 

Source: papers.ssrn.com

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

07
Dic
14

Statement on Prediction Markets by Kenneth J. Arrow, Shyam Sunder, Robert Forsythe, Robert E. Litan, Eric Zitzewitz, Michael Gorham, Robert W. Hahn, Robin Hanson, Daniel Kahneman, John O. Ledyard, …

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Prediction markets are markets for contracts that yield payments based on the outcome of an uncertain future event, such as a presidential election. Using these markets as forecasting tools could substantially improve decision making in the private and public sectors. 

We argue that U.S. regulators should lower barriers to the creation and design of prediction markets by creating a safe harbor for certain types of small stakes markets. We believe our proposed change has the potential to stimulate innovation in the design and use of prediction markets throughout the economy, and in the process to provide information that will benefit the private sector and government alike. 

See on papers.ssrn.com

07
Dic
14

Brain Study Uncovers New Clues on How Cues May Affect Memory – News Center – The University of Texas at Dallas

A new study from the UT Dallas Center for Vital Longevity shows that the brain activity prior to seeing an item is related to how well it is later remembered.

In the study published online in NeuroImage, the researchers showed that receiving information about a pair of items before seeing them may affect how well they are remembered. Moreover, the researchers also found that the activity in different areas of the brain was unexpectedly related to how the information was remembered.

“If you’re interested in memory, you want to know the factors that are associated with it being worse as well as what makes it better,” said Dr. Richard Addante, a senior lecturer in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences and lead author of the paper. “Knowledge of these factors can lead to developing ways to help improve memory.”

The researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging to look for activity in different areas of the brain as a participant decided which of two words or pictures would fit inside the other — for example, a dog and a house. But moments before the task, participants were shown a cue — an “X” if the items would be presented as words or an “O” if they would be presented as pictures. About 20 minutes later, outside of the MRI scanner, the participants were tested on how well they remembered the pairs of items.

Source: www.utdallas.edu

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond




Time is real? I think not

dicembre: 2014
L M M G V S D
« Nov   Gen »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Commenti recenti

Lorenzo Bosio su Un testo che trascende le sue…

Inserisci il tuo indirizzo e-mail per iscriverti a questo blog e ricevere notifiche di nuovi messaggi per e-mail.

Segui assieme ad altri 1.044 follower

Latest Tweets

Annunci

%d blogger hanno fatto clic su Mi Piace per questo: