Archivio per 15 gennaio 2015

15
Gen
15

Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman – Premortem to eliminate thinking biases. – YouTube

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

See on youtube.com

Annunci
15
Gen
15

Dal marketing politico alla politica. – Luigi D’Elia

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

<<Là dove il mondo reale si cambia in semplici immagini, le semplici immagini diventano degli esseri reali, e le motivazioni efficienti di un comportamento ipnotico>> e più avanti aggiunge: <<Più (lo spettatore) contempla, meno vive; più accetta di riconoscersi nelle immagini dominanti del bisogno, meno comprende la propria esistenza e il proprio desiderio>>

Non c’è alcun motivo per affermare che un blog non debba essere inscritto nella logica della spettacolarizzazione della politica intesa debordianamente come sublimazione di una merce. Non c’è ragione che un blog debba essere differente, migliore, più democratico. No, non ci sono ragioni per affermarlo. Per moltissimi versi il web è casomai l’evoluzione più alta di tale spettacolarizzazione: un ambiente elettivo dove ognuno fa e diventa spettacolo

See on luigidelia.it

15
Gen
15

Neuroeconomia. Quando tra il tuo cervello e quello di un cocainomane non passa alcuna differenza. – Luigi D’Elia

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

È da un po’ tempo ormai che vado pensando che economia e psicologia stiano ormai convergendo verso un‘unica scienza, se non altro perché alcune aree di punta di entrambe le discipline si occupano non a caso più o meno delle stesse tematiche. Se vuoi capire come funziona il comportamento economico e i suoi processi decisionali, ben al di là delle teorie economiche classiche, chiedi pure ad alcuni psicologi; e se vuoi capire la cifra esistenziale del soggetto contemporaneo e le sue più profonde determinazioni motivazionali, chiedi pure ad alcuni economisti.

La Neuroeconomia non è altro che la conferma finale di questa mia bizzarra (ma poi neanche tanto) idea. Di cosa si tratta? Chiedo aiuto al Prof. Matteo Motterlini (Università San Raffaele di Milano), il quale da alcuni anni è efficace ricercatore nonché divulgatore di questa nuova scienza di confine:

See on luigidelia.it

15
Gen
15

BIT Policy School: How to Build Capabilities in Public Service, Drawing on Behavioural Insights | The Behavioural Insights Team

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Last week, we completed another BIT Policy School. Based on a concept that our Managing Director, Owain Service, devised with Cabinet Office colleagues when BIT was still part of the government, BIT Policy School isn’t a normal training course.

It’s an intensive, 3 day programme that takes participants through a real life behavioural insights policy problem.

Participants are set the challenge of solving the problem, drawing on BIT’s methodology. But there are various elements of BIT Policy School that make it particularly engaging and challenging. And many of these elements are themselves good examples of how we draw on ideas from behavioural science to shape how we do things differently from other organisations. 

First of all, it’s a competition. Participants are split in to teams. And the teams compete against each other to come up with the best solution.  

Second, the judges are individuals that the participants respect and want to impress. In this case Edward Troup (Second Permanent Secretary of HMRC, was joined by David Halpern, our CEO, to determine which team won. This means that BIT Policy School builds towards the final event of the programme: the final pitch to the senior panel, at which the judging is done.

Third, the training is delivered by people who actually use behavioural insights and have helped develop BIT’s methodologies. For too long, government training has been delivered by external consultants with little knowledge of real life policymaking. This is not the case during BIT Policy School.

Fourth, we run BIT Policy School in partnership with the organisation that sets the challenge that participants tackle. This helps to ensure that the organisation itself participates fully in the programme, helping to organise front-line visits and workshops with experts. And very often the organisation takes the ideas that have been generated and implements them. 

We think that the ‘Policy School’ approach, which many UK government departments are now using for their own training programmes, is a great way of engaging staff and building capabilities. We’d love to hear from you if you think so too!

See on behaviouralinsights.co.uk

15
Gen
15

Do Psychological Fallacies Influence Trading in Financial Markets? Evidence from the Foreign Exchange Market

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond
Research in both economics and psychology suggests that, when agents predict the next value of a random series, they frequently exhibit two types of biases, which are called the gambler’s fallacy (GF) and the hot hand fallacy (HHF). The gambler’s fallacy is to expect a negative correlation in a process which is in fact random. The hot hands fallacy is more or less the opposite of this – to believe that another heads is more likely after a run of heads. The evidence for these fallacies comes largely from situations where they are not punished (lotteries, casinos and laboratory experiments with random returns). In many real-world situations, such as in financial markets, succumbing to fallacies is costly, which gives an incentive to overcome them. The present study is based on high-frequency data from a market-maker in the foreign exchange market. Trading behaviour is only partly explained by the rational exploitation of past patterns in the data, but there is also evidence of the gambler’s fallacy: a tendency to sell the dollar after it has risen persistently or strongly.   
See on d.repec.org

15
Gen
15

Dark Matter of the Mind » IAI TV

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Dark Matter of the Mind All scientists believe evolution is responsible for how humans are the way we are. But evolutionary theory alone cannot explain the diversity of our behaviour. 

Who are we? How did we get to be this way? These are two of the greatest questions facing our species. The answers are still emerging after decades of field research in linguistics and anthropology, evolutionary theory, psychology, and neuroscience. But one thing is clear. Humans act, think, and exist according to the parameters of the dark matter of their minds – the things that they do not know that they know – their “unknown knowns” to shamelessly appropriate the words of Donald Rumsfeld.

All scientists believe that at some level evolution is responsible for how we humans got to be the way we are. But evolutionary theory alone is not enough. While superficially, humans are alike in many ways, at the same time, we are a varied species, with enormous differences separating individuals even within the same cultures, shaped in profound ways by our life experiences.

See on iainews.iai.tv

15
Gen
15

UZH – Foundations of Human Social Behavior – Einführung in die Neuroökonomie und Soziale Neurowissenschaften

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond
Veranstaltungsinhalt

Diese Lehrveranstaltung gibt eine Einführung in die neuen Fachgebiete “Neuroökonomie” und “Soziale Neurowissenschaften”. Teil 1 (vier Sitzungen) informiert über die Grundlagen, die man benötigt, um die Ergebnisse der Neuroökonomie und der Sozialen Neurowissenschaften zu verstehen und zu interpretieren. Neurowissenschaftliche Methoden (fMRT, EEG, TMS usw.) werden vorgestellt und ihre jeweiligen Vor- und Nachteile erklärt; zudem wird ein Überblick über relevante Gehirnstrukturen gegeben. Teil 2 (fünf Sitzungen) behandelt die neurowissenschaftlichen Grundlagen der Belohnungsmodelle (Konzept des erwarteten Nutzens, Prospect Theory usw.), der Entscheidungsfindung, des Risikos, der Heuristik und der Verzerrungen. Teil 3 (fünf Sitzungen) konzentriert sich auf das “soziale Gehirn”, d.h. wie wir die Gefühle und Motivationen anderer verstehen, wann und warum wir anderen vertrauen und die phylogenetischen und entwicklungspsychologischen Grundlagen des Sozialverhaltens und der sozialen Präferenzen, und zwar auf der Basis von Untersuchungen über nichtmenschliche Primaten und Kinder. Der letzte Veranstaltungsabschnitt fasst die Lehrveranstaltung zusammen mit einer Besprechung der Möglichkeiten und Gefahren der Forschung und Befunde der Neuroökonomie und der Sozialen Neurowissenschaften.

 
See on socialbehavior.uzh.ch




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