Archivio per 11 febbraio 2015

11
Feb
15

Nudging parental health behavior with and without children’s pestering power: fat tax, subsidy or both?

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Abstract: We study the effect of several food fiscal policies as a way of nudging consumers towards a healthier way of eating. Our experimental design varies prices of healthier and unhealthier alternatives of food products for children. We also examine the interplay of children’s pestering power. Results from our lab experiment suggest that (a) implementing a fat tax and a subsidy simultaneously can nudge parents to choose healthier products, (b) providing information regarding the fiscal policies in place can further increase the impact of the intervention, and © kid’s pestering power is one of the causes of the policies’ moderate effectiveness.

 
See on ageconsearch.umn.edu

11
Feb
15

Factors influencing the purchase and consumers’ willingness to pay for ground bison

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond
Abstract: A consumer preference study that included willingness to pay and consumer sensory experiments was conducted for ground bison versus ground beef. A total of 82 subjects completed the study. The initial statistical analysis suggest that there is consistent consumer behavior with respect to consumer preference and frequency of consumption within species consumption options, but consistent consumer behavior appears to weaken when across species consumption preferences is compared to across species frequency of consumption patterns. 
See on ageconsearch.umn.edu

11
Feb
15

Digit ratio and risk taking: Evidence from a large, multi-ethnic sample

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond
Abstract: Using a large (n=543) multi-ethnic sample of laboratory subjects, we systematically investigate the link between the digit ratio (the ratio of the length of the index finger to the length of the ring finger, also called 2D:4D ratio) and two measures of individual risk taking: (i) risk preferences over lotteries with real monetary incentives and (ii) self-reported risk attitude. Previous studies have found that the digit ratio, a proxy for pre-natal testosterone exposure, correlates with risk taking in some subject samples, but not others. In our sample, we find, first, that the right-hand digit ratio is significantly associated with risk preferences: subjects with lower right-hand ratios tend to choose more risky lotteries. Second, the right-hand digit ratio is not associated with self-reported risk attitudes. Third, there is no statistically significant association between the left-hand digit ratio and either measure of individual risk taking.
See on chapman.edu

11
Feb
15

Brain-injury data used to map intelligence in the brain

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond
A new study found that specific structures, primarily on the left side of the brain, are vital to general intelligence and executive function (the ability to regulate and control behavior). Brain regions that are associated with general intelligence and executive function are shown in color, with red indicating common areas, orange indicating regions specific to general intelligence, and yellow indicating areas specific to executive function.

April 10, 2012
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Scientists report that they have mapped the physical architecture of intelligence in the brain. This is one of the largest and most comprehensive analyses so far of the brain structures vital to general intelligence and to specific aspects of intellectual functioning, such as verbal comprehension and working memory.

See on sciencedaily.com

11
Feb
15

The Parent Agenda, the Emerging Democratic Focus – New York Times

See on Scoop.itreal utopias

A reinvigorated liberal agenda has emerged in the months since the midterm elections, aimed at issues of interest to the middle class.

See on nytimes.com

11
Feb
15

Branding insights: an interdisciplinary journey from perception to action

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Abstract: Our interdisciplinary study examines the brand’s perceived intentions and ability, as predictors of consumer behavior. In an attempt of answering a call for research in the branding area, we found out contradictory views, both of them based on strong arguments, including empirical results. Each view has been examined by the lens of branding, social cognition and behavioral theory. We found convergent findings from cognitive psychology and behavioral theory to support one of the two views and to extract a hypothesis. Thus, we hypothesized that an effective branding process, meant to achieve both consumer trust and sales objectives, should address the brand’s perceived intentions before ability. We suggest that further empirical studies are needed to test the hypothesis, although for some particular cases, tests confirmed the priority of intentions. Overall, our paper offers an integrative view of consumer underlying behaviors revealed by results of other social sciences and how should be used in brand construction process. The benefits of updating branding theories by integrating results confirmed by other social sciences are discussed.

 
See on mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de




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