Archivio per 12 marzo 2015

12
Mar
15

Developing Potential Through Networks

See on Scoop.itBrain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots

“We add value to society-at-large when we dare to connect.” – Gibran Rivera This week I was in a conversation with someone who asked me what the difference is between “networking” and “network buil…

See on interactioninstitute.org

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12
Mar
15

Alzheimer’s Treatment Using Ultrasound Completely Restores Memory

See on Scoop.itSocial Neuroscience Advances

Breakthrough Alzheimer’s treatment may restore memory and clear plaques in the brain without drugs.

Jocelyn Stoller’s insight:

In rodents so far

See on spring.org.uk

12
Mar
15

Laziness Is More Complex Than You Think: How a More Nuanced Approach Can Help Us Overcome Laziness When Needed

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

When I was in high school, I was what you would call a lazy student. Studying, doing my homework, preparing for exams – none of these were activities I was particularly good at. My father would often say that I lacked “Sitzfleisch,” a German word that translates to “sitting meat” and refers to the capability of sitting on your behind and getting your work done. When I reached 11th grade, however, everything changed. I met a teacher who visibly cared about his subject, Biology, and what he taught actually interested me. Gone were the days of struggling to study. Instead, I started to devour books upon books about biology and even arranged for a biology tutor. Interestingly, this attitude generalized to other subjects as well, such that by the end of 12th grade, my father stopped calling me lazy and proudly announced that I had finally developed “Sitzfleisch.”

But was it really that simple? Is laziness a trait that one can get rid of over time? The answer, in my opinion, is a resounding “No.” To this day, I am still lazy in some situations, but not in others. Laziness, I believe, is not a trait that one has or does not have but is instead a set of states and habits. I think that what we call laziness is actually a blanket term for a wide range of behaviors that have different roots and origins. Overcoming laziness, then, does not merely require a single approach, such as developing “Sitzfleisch,” but instead depends on the type of laziness we encounter. Here, I outline different kinds of laziness, what their root causes may be, and how we can best overcome laziness when desired or necessary.

 

We also need to recognize that sometimes, being lazy is far from a sin. After all, isn’t getting to take a deserved break why we expend effort in the first place?…

See on huffingtonpost.com

12
Mar
15

How to predict customer behaviour

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

One of the biggest frustrations in business is trying to predict what your customers will do in response to an initiative. 

Excavating my new backyard recently, I found a whole lot of paving that had been overrun by grass.

It struck me that this is not dissimilar to how we typically look at those we are trying to influence – we have based our assumptions on the grass we see before us when if we dig a little deeper we’ll find a whole pattern of robust pavers just waiting to make our lives easier.

But what will they do?

One of the biggest frustrations in business is trying to predict what your customers (stakeholders, clients, staff, investors, managers…) will do in response to your initiative.

As a result, we base our best guess on any or all of the following:

Feedback: What they tell usExperience: What they’ve done in the pastIntuition: How we assume people behave

Unfortunately there are traps in relying on these methods.

See on smartcompany.com.au

12
Mar
15

How to Nudge People Toward Smarter Cancer-Screening Decisions

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

It’s a System 1 and System 2 thing.When it comes to cancer screening, there’s no one correct answer that applies to every scenario. Different people face different risk factors, and you can’t screen every person for every possible type of cancer, so it’s a matter of cost-benefit analysis — some types of screenings are more likely to lead to potentially harmful false positives, for example, while others, if they detect cancer, will detect slow-growing forms of it that are very unlikely to kill or seriously harm the patient before something else does, so determining the “right” amount of cancer screening is a really difficult public-health challenge.

See on nymag.com

12
Mar
15

The Power of Nudges

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Verhaltensökonomie ist nicht Nudging – Aber Nudging ist Verhaltensökonomie The Power of Nudges – Einsatz und Grenzen sanfter Stupser – Behavioral Economics Net…

See on slideshare.net

12
Mar
15

More Encouragement to Walk the Stairs Peter Ubel Duke

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

A while back, I posted an interesting effort to get people to walk upstairs, rather than take the escalator. It involved a staircase designed to look like a piano, with musical sounds generated when people stepped on each stair. I love that approach not only because it is clever, but because I am a serious pianist. It appealed to my inner musician.

For those more visually inclined, here is another interesting set of stairs, in a picture brought to my attention by Bob Peck (@MakeABetterOne).

See on peterubel.com




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