Archivio per 12 aprile 2015

12
Apr
15

Seeking Perfection? There’s a Better Way.

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Are you a maximizer or a satisifcer? 

I want the best for myself and my children—naturally. Why settle for less? We live in a society of plenty, so we often simply go for it and ask for exactly what we want. An almost inaudible, but powerful voice inside of us might tell us to reach for the best and only the best.

Is this always a good choice though?

Malcolm Gladwell, who madeunconscious decisions a popular topic with his book Blink, insists that people who have their individual taste buds satisfied are happier for it. Researchers, he pointed out, have found that there is no such thing as a perfect Pepsi or coffee type or tomato sauce. There are only perfect Pepsis, coffee types and tomato sauces. There are clusters of people who like a particular taste of a given product; for example, a cluster liking sodas very sweet, another medium sweet, and yet another a tad sweet1. When food corporations honored these more varied ideas of “perfect,” they beat their competitors by large margins and made fortunes. So, corporations get richer and individuals happier with the perfect choice—a win-win situation.

See on psychologytoday.com

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12
Apr
15

on “Wishful Thinking”

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Social Scientists traditionally regard people’s beliefs about the future to be exogenous to their desires and wishes. It’s one thing to want something to happen, but it doesn’t suppose to affect our beliefs that it will.  My grandfather’s German passport which I found among my dad’s documents (see photo) shows how beliefs can be intermingled with wishes. Hugo Winter, a Jewish businessman from Koenigsberg, escaped Nazi Germany in 1934 to Palestine, leaving behind a flourishing business, a huge villa, and many friends and relatives. He never wanted to replace his fancy lifestyle in Germany

See on linkedin.com

12
Apr
15

Misbehaving- The Making of Behavioural Economics – how to: academy

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

how to: Misbehaving- The Making of Behavioural Economicswith Richard H. Thaler, bestselling co-author of Nudge.

BUSI­NESSPSY­CHO­LOGY
This talk for the How To Academy coincides with the publication of Richard Thaler’s new book on behavioural economics.

Richard Thaler has spent his career studying the radical notion that the central agents in the economy are humans—predictable, error-prone individuals. Traditional economics assumes rational actors. Early in his research, Thaler realized these Spock-like automatons were nothing like real people. Whether buying an alarm clock, selling football tickets, or applying for a mortgage, we all succumb to biases and make decisions that deviate from the standards of rationality assumed by economists.

In other words, we misbehave.

Dismissed at first by economists as an amusing sideshow, the study of human miscalculations and their effects on markets now drives efforts to make better decisions in our lives, our businesses, and our governments.

See on howtoacademy.com

12
Apr
15

Reading Fiction Improves Brain Connectivity and Function

See on Scoop.itSocial Neuroscience Advances

Reading a novel has the power to reshape your brain and improve theory of mind.

See on psychologytoday.com




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