Archivio per maggio 2016

31
Mag
16

(via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p9FPSZFnsNs) A prescindere che si condividano o meno, le famose “considerazioni finali del governatore della Banca d’Italia sono sempre state seguite perché chiariscono cosa si è fatto o si voleva fare dal punto di vista economico (senno del poi) e quali sono le iniziative intraprese e le eventuali correzioni da adottare. Questo non implica ripeto che siano giuste e corrette ma sono certamente la versione reale delle scelte in materia economica e le critiche e i consigli sono quanto il governo e le forse economiche cercheranno di mettere in atto nei prossimi mesi. Quindi consiglio un ascolto attento. 

31
Mag
16

Will You Ever Be Able to Upload Your Brain?

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Your mind, in all its complexity, dies with you. And that’s it.

SOME hominid along the evolutionary path to humans was probably the first animal with the cognitive ability to understand that it would someday die. To be human is to cope with this knowledge. Many have been consoled by the religious promise of life beyond this world, but some have been seduced by the hope that they can escape death in this world. Such hopes, from Ponce de León’s quest to find a fountain of youth to the present vogue for cryogenic preservation, inevitably prove false. In recent times it has become appealing to believe that your dead brain might be preserved sufficiently by freezing so that some future civilization could bring your mind back to life. Assuming that no future scientists will reverse death, the hope is that they could analyze your brain’s structure and use this to recreate a functioning mind, whether in engineered living tissue or in a computer with a robotic body. By functioning, I mean thinking, feeling, talking, seeing, hearing, learning, remembering, acting. Your mind would wake up, much as it wakes up after a night’s sleep, with your own memories, feelings and patterns of thought, and continue on into the world.

See on nytimes.com

29
Mag
16

Predicting Consumer Choice with Neuroimaging? It’s Simpler Than You Think!

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

New Neuromarketing bridges the gap between fuzzy science and straight solid application. Our team of writers uncover the biggest neuromarketing gems each month and transform them into clear bit-sized articles. No abstractions. No jargon. No p-values.

See on newneuromarketing.com

29
Mag
16

The 5 Brilliant Emotional Intelligence Tactics This FBI Agent Uses to Negotiate

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Not a hardcore negotiator? No problem. Here’s how to make emotions work for you.

My father was a hardcore negotiator–the kind that used car salesmen actually feared. Not me. For years, I cringed in similar situations. I was a peacemaker by nature–to a fault. Afraid to push too much for fear of losing out altogether, I often settled…and ended up with the short end of the stick. But that changed when I started studying successful negotiators. In time, I realized that the ability to understand emotions and use them to work for me, also known as emotional intelligence (EI or EQ), could be valuable at the negotiating table. Chris Voss, founder and CEO of The Black Swan Group and author of Never Split the Difference, is a former lead international kidnapping negotiator for the FBI. In a recent piece for TIME, Voss detailed a few of his strategies for winning negotiations. As he explains, the traditional advice to show “a poker face” and keep emotions out of the negotiating room is completely wrong.

See on inc.com

29
Mag
16

Your brain does not process information and it is not a computer – Robert Epstein | Aeon Essays

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Your brain does not process information, retrieve knowledge or store memories. In short: your brain is not a computer

No matter how hard they try, brain scientists and cognitive psychologists will never find a copy of Beethoven’s 5th Symphony in the brain – or copies of words, pictures, grammatical rules or any other kinds of environmental stimuli. The human brain isn’t really empty, of course. But it does not contain most of the things people think it does – not even simple things such as ‘memories’. Our shoddy thinking about the brain has deep historical roots, but the invention of computers in the 1940s got us especially confused. For more than half a century now, psychologists, linguists, neuroscientists and other experts on human behaviour have been asserting that the human brain works like a computer.

See on aeon.co

29
Mag
16

The Bias Within The Bias

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Recall this pivotal scene from the 1997 movie, Men in Black. James Edwards (Will Smith, or Agent J) arrives at the headquarters of MiB – a secret agency that protects Earth from extraterrestrial threats – to compete with “the best of the best” for a position. Edwards, a confident and cocky NYPD officer, completes various tests including a simulation where he shoots an ostensibly innocent schoolgirl. When asked why, Edwards explains that compared to the freakish aliens, the girl posed the biggest threat. He passes the test: potentially dangerous aliens are always disguised as real humans. Agent K (Tommy Lee Jones) offers him a position at MiB and the remaining candidates’ memories are erased. They return to normal life without ever realizing that the aliens were a ruse – a device for Agent K to detect how sagacious the candidates really were. This wily test of intelligence and mindfulness is defined by two characteristics.

See on blogs.scientificamerican.com

28
Mag
16

Human Heuristics for Autonomous Agents

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Abstract. We investigate the problem of autonomous agents processing pieces of information that may be corrupted (tainted). Agents have the option of contacting a central database for a reliable check of the status of the message, but this procedure is costly and therefore should be used with parsimony. Agents have to evaluate the risk of being infected, and decide if and when communicating partners are affordable. Trustability is implemented as a personal (one-to-one) record of past contacts among agents, and as a mean-field monitoring of the level of message corruption. Moreover, this information is slowly forgotten in time, so that at the end everybody is checked against the database. We explore the behavior of a homogeneous system in the case of a fixed pool of spreaders of corrupted messages, and in the case of spontaneous appearance of corrupted messages.

See on arxiv.org

28
Mag
16

Structural balance and opinion separation in trust-mistrust social networks

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Structural balance theory has been developed in sociology and psychology to explain how interacting agents, e.g., countries, political parties, opinionated individuals, with mixed trust and mistrust relationships evolve into polarized camps. Recent results have shown that structural balance is necessary for polarization in networks with fixed, strongly connected neighbor relationships when the opinion dynamics are described by DeGroot-type averaging rules. We develop this line of research in this paper in two steps. First, we consider fixed, not necessarily strongly connected, neighbor relationships. It is shown that if the network includes a strongly connected subnetwork containing mistrust, which influences the rest of the network, then no opinion clustering is possible when that subnetwork is not structurally balanced; all the opinions become neutralized in the end. In contrast, it is shown that when that subnetwork is indeed structurally balanced, the agents of the subnetwork evolve into two polarized camps and the opinions of all other agents in the network spread between these two polarized opinions. Second, we consider time-varying neighbor relationships. We show that the opinion separation criteria carry over if the conditions for fixed graphs are extended to joint graphs. The results are developed for both discrete-time and continuous-time models.

See on arxiv.org

28
Mag
16

K-method of cognitive mapping analysis

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Introduced a new calculation method (K-method) for cognitive maps. K – method consists of two consecutive steps. In the first stage, allocated subgraph composed of all paths from one selected node (concept) to another node (concept) from the cognitive map (directed weighted graph) . In the second stage, after the transition to an undirected graph (symmetrization adjacency matrix) the influence of one node to another calculated with Kirchhoff method. In the proposed method, there is no problem inherent in the impulse method. In addition to “pair” influence of one node to another, the average characteristics are introduced, allowing to calculate the impact of the selected node to all other nodes and the influence of all on the one selected. For impulse method similar to the average characteristics in the case where the pulse method “works” are introduced and compared with the K-method.

See on arxiv.org

28
Mag
16

Influence Activation Model: A New Perspective in Social Influence Analysis and Social Network Evolution

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

What drives the propensity for the social network dynamics? Social influence is believed to drive both off-line and on-line human behavior, however it has not been considered as a driver of social network evolution. Our analysis suggest that, while the network structure affects the spread of influence in social networks, the network is in turn shaped by social influence activity (i.e., the process of social influence wherein one person’s attitudes and behaviors affect another’s). To that end, we develop a novel model of network evolution where the dynamics of network follow the mechanism of influence propagation, which are not captured by the existing network evolution models. Our experiments confirm the predictions of our model and demonstrate the important role that social influence can play in the process of network evolution. As well exploring the reason of social network evolution, different genres of social influence have been spotted having different effects on the network dynamics. These findings and methods are essential to both our understanding of the mechanisms that drive network evolution and our knowledge of the role of social influence in shaping the network structure.

Alessandro Cerboni’s insight:
Share your insight

See on arxiv.org




Time is real? I think not

maggio: 2016
L M M G V S D
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Commenti recenti

Inserisci il tuo indirizzo e-mail per iscriverti a questo blog e ricevere notifiche di nuovi messaggi per e-mail.

Unisciti ad altri 1.147 follower

Latest Tweets


%d blogger hanno fatto clic su Mi Piace per questo: