Archivio per 13 maggio 2016

13
Mag
16

Impact of Economic Assumptions on Policy – UWCS

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Impact of Assumptions in Economic Analysis on Policy

This presentation examines the impact of economic assumptions on policy decisions. Economic analysis of targets for sustainable buildings by the Queensland Competition Authority (QCA) and the Rainwater Harvesting Association of Australia (RHAA) is examined as a case study. Contested points include which costs and benefits are inside or outside the boundaries of legitimate and recognised consideration. This presentation refers to those differences as boundary conditions and considers how these assumptions affect the outcome of analysis and government policy. Setting of boundary conditions (what was included, what was excluded and assumptions) in engineering and economic analysis dominates outcomes of decisions about government policy. The investigations outlined in this paper were combined to create an enhanced version of a systems analysis of a policy for setting targets for water savings on all new dwellings. It was established, using appropriate boundary conditions, that a 40% target for water savings is feasible for South East Queensland and provides a cost-benefit ratio of 2.1. These results indicate that a policy of mandating targets for sustainable buildings would provide substantial benefits to the state of Queensland, water utilities and citizens.

See on urbanwatercyclesolutions.com

Annunci
13
Mag
16

Badges to Acknowledge Open Practices: A Simple, Low-Cost, Effective Method for Increasing Transparency

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Abstract Beginning January 2014, Psychological Science gave authors the opportunity to signal open data and materials if they qualified for badges that accompanied published articles. Before badges, less than 3% of Psychological Science articles reported open data. After badges, 23% reported open data, with an accelerating trend; 39% reported open data in the first half of 2015, an increase of more than an order of magnitude from baseline. There was no change over time in the low rates of data sharing among comparison journals. Moreover, reporting openness does not guarantee openness. When badges were earned, reportedly available data were more likely to be actually available, correct, usable, and complete than when badges were not earned. Open materials also increased to a weaker degree, and there was more variability among comparison journals. Badges are simple, effective signals to promote open practices and improve preservation of data and materials by using independent repositories.

See on journals.plos.org

13
Mag
16

Predictions on the go: Prevalence of spontaneous spending predictions

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Abstract The present research examines the prevalence of predictions in daily life. Specifically we examine whether spending predictions for specific purchases occur spontaneously in life outside of a laboratory setting. Across community samples and student samples, overall self-report and diary reports, three studies suggest that people make spending predictions for about two-thirds of purchases in everyday life. In addition, we examine factors that increase the likelihood of spending predictions: the size of purchase, payment form, time pressure, personality variables, and purchase decisions. Spending predictions were more likely for larger, more exceptional purchases and for item and project predictions rather than time periods.

See on docs.google.com

13
Mag
16

“Isn’t everyone like me?”: On the presence of self-similarity in strategic interactions

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

We propose that in strategic interactions a player is influenced by self-similarity. Self-similarity means that a player who chooses some action X tends to believe, to a greater extent than a player who chooses a different action, that other players will also choose action X. To demonstrate this phenomenon, we analyze the actions and the reported beliefs of players in a two-player two-action symmetric game. The game has the feature that for “materialistic” players, who wish to maximize their own payoff, there should be negative correlation between players’ actions and the beliefs that they assign to their opponent choosing the same action. We first elicit participants’ preferences over the outcomes of the game, and identify a large group of materialistic players. We then ask participants to choose an action in the game and report their beliefs. The reported beliefs of materialistic players are positively correlated with their actions, i.e., they are more likely to choose an action the stronger is their belief that their opponent will also choose the same action. We view this pattern as evidence for the presence of self-similarity.

See on docs.google.com

13
Mag
16

Correlation between risk aversion and loss aversion – Decision Science News

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

LOSS AVERSION AND RISK AVERSION ARE CORRELATED (AT LEAST WITH OUR TECHNIQUE) rala A student recently emailed us asking for some data from our 2008 paper: Goldstein, Daniel G., Johnson, Eric J. & Sharpe, William F. (2008). Choosing outcomes versus choosing products: Consumer-focused retirement investment advice. Journal of Consumer Research, 35(3), 440-456. In particular, they were interested in the correlation between estimates of risk aversion and loss aversion within a person, which can be seen in the above plot (Figure 4 in the article). We thought, why not make the data open to the whole world. Here they are: Goldstein, Johnson, Sharpe (2008) Loss Aversion and Risk Aversion Data subject: An anonymous identifier indexing the unique human who submitted the data dist: participants submitted two distributions (one right after another) in Year 1. They were invited back in Year 2 to submit distributions again. There was some dropout. This column tells you which distribution you are looking at. riskAversion: this is the coefficient of relative risk aversion, commonly referred to as alpha lossAversion: this is the coefficient of loss aversion, commonly referred to as lambda

See on decisionsciencenews.com




Time is real? I think not

maggio: 2016
L M M G V S D
« Apr   Giu »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Commenti recenti

Lorenzo Bosio su Un testo che trascende le sue…

Inserisci il tuo indirizzo e-mail per iscriverti a questo blog e ricevere notifiche di nuovi messaggi per e-mail.

Segui assieme ad altri 1.040 follower

Latest Tweets

Annunci

%d blogger hanno fatto clic su Mi Piace per questo: