Archivio per 1 luglio 2016

01
Lug
16

How Super-Connectivity Kills Economics – The Atlantic

See on Scoop.itBehavioral Economics

The AtlanticHow Super-Connectivity Kills EconomicsThe AtlanticAs the Internet multiplied and strengthened interconnections, positive feedback increasingly drove our economic, financial, political, business, and social spheres, which in turn led to…

See on theatlantic.com

Annunci
01
Lug
16

‘Brain Bugs’: Cognitive Flaws That ‘Shape Our Lives’ : NPR

See on Scoop.itBehavioral Economics
http://www.npr.org/v2/?i=137552517&m=137793330&t=audio

Neuroscientist Dean Buonomano explains why our brains make mistakes when we try to remember long lists of information or add large numbers in our heads. Humans live “in a time and place we didn’t evolve to live in,” he says.

See on npr.org

01
Lug
16

Neuroscienze cognitive: plasticità, variabilità, dimensione storica

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Le Neuroscienze cognitive hanno l’ambizioso obiettivo teorico di individuare e comprendere i meccanismi neurobiologici della mente,

See on cittadellascienza.it

01
Lug
16

From “Economic Man” to Behavioral Economics

A short history of modern decision making. This line of research—dubbed heuristics and biases, although you may be more familiar with its offshoot, behavioral economics—has become the dominant academic approach to understanding decisions. Its practitioners have had a major influence on business, government, and financial markets. Their books—Predictably Irrational; Thinking, Fast and Slow; and Nudge,to name three of the most important—have suffused popular culture. So far, so good. This research has been enormously informative and valuable. Our world, and our understanding of decision making, would be much poorer without it. It is not, however, the only useful way to think about making decisions

See on hbr.org

01
Lug
16

Behavioral Economics Holds Potential To Deliver Better Results For Patients, Insurers, And Employers

Many programs being implemented by US employers, insurers, and health care providers use incentives to encourage patients to take better care of themselves. We critically review a range of these efforts and show that many programs, although well-meaning, are unlikely to have much impact because they require information, expertise, and self-control that few patients possess. As a result, benefits are likely to accrue disproportionately to patients who already are taking adequate care of their health. We show how these programs could be made more effective through the use of insights from behavioral economics. For example, incentive programs that offer patients small and frequent payments for behavior that would benefit the patients, such as medication adherence, can be more effective than programs with incentives that are far less visible because they are folded into a paycheck or used to reduce a monthly premium. Deploying more-nuanced insights from behavioral economics can lead to policies with the potential to increase patient engagement and deliver dividends for patients and favorable cost-effectiveness ratios for insurers, employers, and other relevant commercial entities.

Behavioral Economics Holds Potential To Deliver Better Results For Patients, Insurers, And Employers
George Loewenstein, David A. Asch and Kevin G. Volpp

http://dx.doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2012.1163 
Health Aff July 2013 vol. 32 no. 7 1244-1250

See on content.healthaffairs.org




Time is real? I think not

luglio: 2016
L M M G V S D
« Giu   Ago »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Commenti recenti

Lorenzo Bosio su Un testo che trascende le sue…

Inserisci il tuo indirizzo e-mail per iscriverti a questo blog e ricevere notifiche di nuovi messaggi per e-mail.

Segui assieme ad altri 1.159 follower

Latest Tweets

Annunci

%d blogger hanno fatto clic su Mi Piace per questo: