Archivio per luglio 2016



23
Lug
16

Cos’è e a cosa serve il marketing nutrizionale?

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Quanto influiscono le logiche di economia e marketing sul problema dell’obesità? Il marketing nutrizionale è in cerca di risposta.

See on insidemarketing.it

Annunci
23
Lug
16

Il priming: unione tra psicologia e pubblicità

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Il priming è un esempio di psicologia applicata al marketing. Consapevole o involontario, influenza il comportamento del consumatore.

See on insidemarketing.it

23
Lug
16

Behavioral Rationality and Heterogeneous Expectations in Complex Economic 

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Recognizing that the economy is a complex system with boundedly rational interacting agents, the book presents a theory of behavioral rationality and heterogeneous expectations in complex economic systems and confronts the nonlinear dynamic models with empirical stylized facts and laboratory experiments. The complexity model- ing paradigm has been strongly advocated since the late 1980s by some economists and by multidisciplinary scientists from various fields, such as physics, computer science and biology. More recently the complexity view has also drawn the attention of policy makers, who are faced with complex phenomena, irregular fluctuations and sudden, unpredictable market transitions. The complexity tools – bifurcations, chaos, multiple equilibria – discussed in this book will help students, researchers and policy makers to build more realis- tic behavioral models with heterogeneous expectations to describe financial market movements and macroeconomic fluctuations, in order to better manage crises in a complex global economy

https://assets.cambridge.org/97811070/19294/frontmatter/9781107019294_frontmatter.pdf

See on assets.cambridge.org

23
Lug
16

Rethinking Marketing and Customers: Lessons from Behavioral Economics

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

The relatively new field of behavioral economics incorporates a range of disciplines, from cognitive science to marketing, in order to paint a more nuanced and whole portrait of human behavior in the marketplace. One of its key revelations has been that consumers are neither fully rational nor fully aware of what drives their own economic decision making. But turning the tightly controlled and sometimes narrow findings of academia into practicable solutions is not always easy. So how does behavioral economics work (or not work) under real-world conditions?

See on insights.som.yale.edu

23
Lug
16

Using Behavioral Economic Field Experiments at a Firm: The Context and Design of the Truckers and Turnover Project

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

The Truckers and Turnover Project is a statistical case study of a single large trucking firm and its driver employees. The cooperating firm operates in the largest segment of the for-hire trucking industry in the United States, the “full truckload” (TL) segment, in which approximately 800,000 peop

See on nber.org

23
Lug
16

Using Behavioral Science Insights to Make Government More Effective, Simpler, and More People-Friendly

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

This month marks one full year since the launch of the first-ever Social and Behavioral Sciences Team (SBST), which was created in response to the President’s call to make government programs more effective and efficient. SBST had a successful first year, launching a wide variety of evidence-based pilots. To mark the one-year anniversary of SBST, the team met with President Obama last Friday.

See on whitehouse.gov

23
Lug
16

An Introduction to Behavioral Economics *

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Dr Alain Samson’s Introduction to Behavioral Economics – Behavioral Science for Beginners

Behavioral economics (BE) uses psychological experimentation to develop theories about human decision making and has identified a range of biases as a result of the way people think and feel. BE is trying to change the way economists think about people’s perceptions of value and expressed preferences. According to BE, people are not always self-interested, benefits maximizing, and costs minimizing individuals with stable preferences—our thinking is subject to insufficient knowledge, feedback, and processing capability, which often involves uncertainty and is affected by the context in which we make decisions. Most of our choices are not the result of careful deliberation. We are influenced by readily available information in memory, automatically generated affect, and salient information in the environment. We also live in the moment, in that we tend to resist change, are poor predictors of future behavior, subject to distorted memory, and affected by physiological and emotional states. Finally, we are social animals with social preferences, such as those expressed in trust, reciprocity and fairness; we are susceptible to social norms and a need for self-consistency. Interdisciplinary Context The field of BE is situated in a larger landscape of social and behavioral sciences, including cognitive and social psychology, and developments in the domain of neuroscience have opened up promising avenues for BE informed by better understanding of the human brain (Camerer, Loewenstein, & Prelec, 2005). It has been argued that BE would benefit from greater connections with other behavioral sciences, such as anthropology, which may be particularly important for domains that incorporate human interaction, especially behavioral game theory (Gintis, 2009). In a related vein, psychologists interested in the evolutionary origins of phenomena studied by behavioral economists have investigated behavioral biases in monkeys (Lakshminarayanan, Chen, & Santos, 2011). Some evolutionary psychologists have challenged assumptions about the rationality that underlies BE, in that seemingly ‘irrational’ judgments and decisions may have been functionally adaptive in our ancestral environment. The use of heuristic shortcuts, for example, is an efficient means for humans to make use of limited knowledge and processing capabilities. According to Herbert Simon, people tend to make decisions by satisficing (a combination of sufficing and satisfying) rather than optimizing (Gigerenzer & Goldstein, 1996), where decisions are often simply good enough in light of the costs and constraints involved. Evolutionary perspectives have also been applied to decision framing, showing that framing effects in a classic ‘lives lost’ versus ‘lives saved’ risky decision problem can change with the number of lives at stake. An “irrational” risk preference reversal effect is present when 600 or 6000 are involved, but it disappears when the number is reduced to 6 or 60. The evolutionary view holds that our thinking patterns evolved in hunter-gatherer environments that involved small groups (Rode & Wang, 2000).

See on behavioraleconomics.com




Time is real? I think not

luglio: 2016
L M M G V S D
« Giu   Ago »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Commenti recenti

Lorenzo Bosio su Un testo che trascende le sue…

Inserisci il tuo indirizzo e-mail per iscriverti a questo blog e ricevere notifiche di nuovi messaggi per e-mail.

Segui assieme ad altri 1.044 follower

Latest Tweets

Annunci

%d blogger hanno fatto clic su Mi Piace per questo: