20
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Scientists Claim That Quantum Theory Proves Consciousness Moves To Another Universe At Death

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

A book titled “Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness Are the Keys to Understanding the Nature of the Universe“ has stirred up the Internet, because it contained a notion that life does not end when the body dies, and it can last forever. The author of this publication, scientist Dr. Rober. 

Lanza is an expert in regenerative medicine and scientific director of Advanced Cell Technology Company. Before he has been known for his extensive research which dealt with stem cells, he was also famous for several successful experiments on cloning endangered animal species.

But not so long ago, the scientist became involved with physics, quantum mechanics and astrophysics. This explosive mixture has given birth to the new theory of biocentrism, which the professor has been preaching ever since.  Biocentrism teaches that life and consciousness are fundamental to the universe.  It is consciousness that creates the material universe, not the other way around.

See on www.spiritscienceandmetaphysics.com

20
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14

Discovery of quantum vibrations in ‘microtubules’ inside brain neurons supports controversial theory of consciousness

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

A review and update of a controversial 20-year-old theory of consciousness claims that consciousness derives from deeper level, finer scale activities inside brain neurons. The recent discovery of quantum vibrations in “microtubules” inside brain neurons corroborates this theory, according to review authors. They suggest that EEG rhythms (brain waves) also derive from deeper level microtubule vibrations, and that from a practical standpoint, treating brain microtubule vibrations could benefit a host of mental, neurological, and cognitive conditions.

See on www.sciencedaily.com

17
apr
14

Effects of Stress on Economic Decision-Making: Evidence from Laboratory Experiments

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Abstract: The ways in which preferences respond to the varying stress of economic environments is a key question for behavioral economics and public policy. We conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the effects of stress on financial decision making among individuals aged 50 and older. Using the cold pressor task as a physiological stressor, and a series of intelligence tests as cognitive stressors, we find that stress increases subjective discounting rates, has no effect on the degree of risk-aversion, and substantially lowers the effort individuals make to learn about financial decisions.

Liam Delaney (liam.delaney@stir.ac.uk), Günther Fink (gfink@hsph.harvard.edu) and Colm P. Harmon (colm.harmon@sydney.edu.au) 
See on ftp.iza.org

17
apr
14

Essay: Our Brains Aren’t to Blame for Our Financial Woes

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Behavioral finance is a breakout star of the post-2008 economic world. A little-known academic discipline a mere decade ago, this combination of psychology and finance now serves as a catchall explanation for why we act against our own financial best interests time and time again.

In the view of many behavioral finance promoters, the fault for our many financial failures is not in our stars, or in a less-than-stable economy. It’s that we’re not rational. Even at the price of our long-term financial well-being, we simply can’t resist falling prey to anything from too-good-to-be-true housing bubbles to impulsive luxury purchases.

It’s a tempting explanation, this behavioral finance thing. Just about all of us can recall money frittered away on fripperies like frappuccinos that we could’ve, should’ve saved for that unexpected medical bill.

It’s our own fault, we think. We shop too much and we fall for housing and stock market bubbles. If only we’d had an automatic savings plan that could have saved us from ourselves! We’d be rich — or at least not in the desperate straits so many of us are in, lacking emergency funds and piling on more credit card debt than we have in savings accounts.

See on www.bloomberg.com

17
apr
14

Manipulate Me: The Booming Business in Behavioral Finance

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

It’s hard to find a place today where concepts of behavioral finance aren’t being applied to real-world situations. From London to Washington to Sydney, governments are experimenting with the psychology of decision-making and trying to “nudge” citizens toward better behaviors, whether that means saving more for retirement or signing an organ donation card. Meanwhile, businesses see opportunities for higher profits. To grab more attention and dollars from consumers, companies as far afield as banks and fitness-app makers carefully design their offerings with consumers’ decision-making quirks in mind. The article discusses some of the challenges encountered in using behavioral science in the commercial sphere which raises an important question about how much change should we expect from the application of behavioral science findings in the commercial market and the difficulty in reaching consumers with well intentioned products designed to “nudge” them into more positive behavior. 

In a crowded market place, how do you get consumers to respond and engage behavioral products or is behavioral science best applied in the policy sphere?

See on www.bloomberg.com

16
apr
14

Vincenzo Barbato: I 12 bias cognitivi che ci impediscono di essere razionali

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Il bias è una forma di distorsione della valutazione causata dal pregiudizio. La mappa mentale d’una persona presenta bias laddove è condizionata da concetti precedenti non necessariamente connessi tra loro da legami logici e validi.
Il bias, contribuendo alla formazione del giudizio, può quindi influenzare un’ideologia, un’opinione, e un comportamento. È probabilmente generato in prevalenza dallecomponenti più ancestrali e istintive del cervello.
Il cervello umano è capace di eseguire 10^16 (10 alla sedicesima processi al secondo), il che lo fa essere più potente di qualsiasi computer oggi esistente. Questo però non significa che i nostri cervelli non abbiano delle limitazioni. Una calcolatrice delle più economiche è migliaia di volte meglio di noi in matematica, spesso la memoria non ci assiste, e in più siamo soggetti a biasis cognitivi, quei fastidiosi difetti del nostro modo di pensare che ci fanno prendere decisioni discutibili e giungere a conclusioni errate. Qui abbiamo raccolto una dozzina dei biasis cognitivi più comuni e dannosi che è necessario conoscere (e nel caso correggere).
Prima di iniziare, è importante distinguere tra biasis cognitivi e fallacie logiche.
Una fallacia logica è un errore nell’argomentazione logica (Es: attacco ad hominem,fallacia del piano inclinato, degli argomenti circolari, ricorso alla forza, etc).
Un biasis cognitivo, invece, è una vera carenza o un limite del nostro pensiero: un difetto nel giudizio che deriva da errori della memoria, attribuzione sociale ed errori di calcolo (ad esempio errori statistici o un falso senso di probabilità).
Alcuni psicologi sociali credono che i nostri biasis cognitivi ci aiutino a elaborare le informazioni in modo più efficiente, soprattutto nelle situazioni di pericolo. Eppure, ci portano a commettere gravi errori. Magari siamo inclini a questo tipo di errori, possiamo imparare però ad esserne consapevoli. Qui ci sono alcuni tra i più importanti da tenere in mente.

See on www.vincenzobarbato.org

15
apr
14

The Exceptional Motivational Power Of Pizza

See on Scoop.itBounded Rationality and Beyond

Over the decades I was involved in more employee surveys than I can recall.  But one thing I do recall is that the single issue that came up in literally all of them – a chronic source of employee frustration – was lack of recognition.   Employees never felt they were getting enough of it.

 

Yesterday I was reminded yet again how big a difference small things make in management.   I was speaking with a young woman in a very good mood.  She’d just gotten out of work – she has a temporary position at a hotel, greeting guests who are in town for conferences – and at the end of the day her supervisor had told her she was doing a fine job and gave her a small card.  The young woman showed me the card.  It said:

“We appreciate your outstanding service!  Thank you for being so welcoming, thoughtful and friendly to our guests.   Please enjoy a slice of pizza & a Pepsi for 75 cents as our thanks.”  At the bottom of the card were listed several local eateries where the card could be redeemed.

I sort of wondered why she had to pay 75 cents – why weren’t the pizza and Pepsi free?  But no matter.  And no matter that the card’s value (let’s assume around here in round numbers a slice of pizza costs $3 and a Pepsi $1) was around $3.25.  The young woman couldn’t have been more pleased.  The card was the highlight of her day.

 

See on www.forbes.com




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